Title Format Sponsor
Serer-Sine
Print

Description

The Serer are famous throughout Senegal and Gambia for their clothing. Serr is a traditional clothing woven by men. Serr is believed to bring good luck to those who wear it. The Serer people are also famous for a form of wrestling that is popular throughout the region called Laamb or Njomb. Serer religion is centered on universal supreme deity called Rog. There are also lesser gods, goddesses and spirits. The Serers strongly believe in the importance of the ancestral spirits (pangool) and reincarnation.

Resource Link
Tumbuka Brochure
Print

Description

The Tumbuka are an ethnic group living in Malawi, Zambia and Tanzania. In the Tumbuka mythology, Chiuta is the chief deity; he is all-powerful, omniscient and self-created. Chiuta literally means Great Bow and is symbolised in the sky by the rainbow. He is also a god of rain and fertility. Tumbuka, like most African languages, has many myths that constitute its cultural heritage.These myths, told around fires at night, often to the accompaniment of drumming and choral responses, aim to teach children moral behavior and to entertain. these vidokoni (fictitious stories) have a moral behind them.

Resource Link
Umbundu Brohcure
Print

Description

The Umbundu language was formed from different groups of people who slowly moved from the North and formed the local/regional groups there today, and have formed political units. They have developed a sophisticated agriculture, which includes the breeding of small animals and cows. In the 16th century they took advantage of the Portuguese communities being established and formed trading routes/ agreements. With each of the routes (caravans), each group became even more independent than they had been. They appointed professional leaders and diviners. The trade thrived on slavery. When slavery decreased around 1904, so did the trade, and finally ended in 1910. This also had somewhat to do with the way trade was conducted. Since the major railway was also built in 1904, the caravans began to die out which meant that the leaders and diviners were not needed anymore.

Resource Link
3 of 674
Show all
Show free resources only
Show less
Show more
Upcoming Events
Jun
2019
3
Texas
Workshop
OER Hangout - Impact of OER on teaching practices

Join us to hear how engagement with OER and/or OEP influenced the teaching practices of four language instructors. There will be a 25 minute presentation segement, and the rest of the time will be for questions and discussion. Information about presenters and their work: Sonia Balasch worked with a team of colleagues to create Español y cultura en perspectiva: A collection of nine critical-thinking thematic lessons composed of Spanish language readings and communicative activities for intermediate-level students of Spanish. Margherita Berti created Italian Open Education, a website that offers a collection of openly-licensed and free-to-use 360-degree virtual reality videos for Italian learners and teachers. Julianne Hammink is working with the Center for ESL at the University of Arizona to develop instructional materials for ESL and Academic Pathways programs. These materials are developed from Open Educational Resources. They are finishing the first year of the project, and many of our instructional materials are now in use. David Thompson completed a series of problem-based learning units for advanced students of Spanish available to instructors online as OER to use or modify. The purpose of the units is to provide advanced students of Spanish a series of compelling problems from Spanish culture and society to solve collaboratively in small teams.

Event Link
Jun
2019
5 - 12
Hawaii
Presentation
2019 NFLRC Webinars: Harnessing High-Leverage Teaching Practices (HLTPs) in Project-Based Language Learning (PBLL)

In our two-part NFLRC Webinars titled Harnessing HLTPs in PBLL, we will explore the question “What HLTP concepts would help me design, develop, and implement PBLL experiences more effectively?” In order to get maximum benefit from the two webinars, we recommend that you 1) familiarize yourself with the six High-Leverage Teaching Practices (HLTPs) beforehand and 2) have experience with Project-Based Language Learning (PBLL). This, however, is not a requirement, and any participant with interest in both is welcome to attend. NOTE: These webinars will be recorded and made available at a later date. Webinar 1: Wednesday, June 5 (PBLL & HLTPs #1-3) Host: Nicole Naditz Guests: Adam Ross & Rachel Mamiya Hernandez Webinar 2: Wednesday, June 12 (PBLL & HLTPs #4-6) Host: Nicole Naditz Guests: Megan Ferry & Laura Sexton Session times (two 90-minute live webinars) 2pm Hawai‘i | 5pm PST | 6pm MST | 7pm CST | 8pm EST Cost Free To register, visit our webpage: https://nflrc.hawaii.edu/events/view/121/. Registration deadline June 4, 2019.

Event Link
Jun
2019
10 - 11
Texas
Workshop
Spanish Heritage Language Workshop

This is a workshop for Spanish teachers of heritage speaking high school and university level students. We will post more information about this workshop as we continue to organize it. Sign up for COERLL's newsletter to receive updates: https://goo.gl/5zPVze.

Event Link
0 - 3 of 13
All LRCs
Previous LRC
Next LRC
In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
  • Research
  • Teaching materials
  • Digital tools and resources
  • Assessment
  • Professional development
  • Less commonly taught languages initiatives
  • K-12 initiatives
  • Outreach and dissemination

Contact Us

You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

Funding

The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
© Title VI Language Resource Centers