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Short-cut proficiency assessments (C-tests)
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Since 2014, the AELRC has developed and piloted eight short-cut proficiency assessments, also referred to as C-tests. These instruments are useful for estimating global proficiency quickly and accurately with diverse populations (such as university, community college, high school, and heritage learners). The AELRC is working to finalize the validation of the Mandarin C-test, develop and validate a C-test in Turkish, and improve the existing C-test in Russian. The AELRC will also develop a web-based system for sharing the instruments with the field. For more information on the development of C-tests across multiple languages, see John Norris (Ed.), Developing C-tests for estimating proficiency in foreign language resource. 2018.

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Language-Specific Materials for Heritage Learners
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Course materials have been developed for the summer high school heritage language courses that were taught at UCLA with STARTALK support. Most heritage languages are also less commonly taught languages, and few materials exist for teachers that are appropriate or can be adapted for heritage language instruction. NHLRC, with support from the National Foreign Language Center’s STARTALK Program, is committed to the development of materials that are suitable for heritage language instruction. DISCLAIMER: These materials are for sharing purposes only and do not necessarily constitute an endorsement by the National Heritage Language Resource Center. We welcome any suggestions and recommendations.

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Catalyst
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E-portfolios aren’t just for students, and students are not the only ones who benefit from reflective practice. We as educators can benefit, too. Research shows that reflective practice facilitates a growth mindset. Those who believe they can develop their intelligence outperform those who believe intelligence is fixed. We’ve been providing e-portfolios for students since 2008. In partnership with Professionals in Education Advancing Research and Language Learning (PEARLL), we’re now developing a professional e-portfolio for educators. Set professional goals, self-assess progress, showcase work, and reflect on your career path. Our professional e-portfolio, Catalyst, also includes learning resources, which we’ll expand in the next four years to include a one-on-one peer mentoring system. With Catalyst, educators can: - Compare their current practices to the Teacher Effectiveness for Language Learning (TELL) framework, a research-based set of characteristics and behaviors that model world language teachers exhibit - Set and monitor goals for professional growth - Upload work samples such as videos and planning documents - Connect with professional learning resources, including peer-to-peer mentoring

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
  • Research
  • Teaching materials
  • Digital tools and resources
  • Assessment
  • Professional development
  • Less commonly taught languages initiatives
  • K-12 initiatives
  • Outreach and dissemination

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You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

Funding

The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
© Title VI Language Resource Centers