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Pathways V. 06 Difficult Characters Interdisciplinary Studies of Chinese and Japanese Writing
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Mary S. Erbaugh has compiled this volume to examine the so-called "ideographic myth" from a variety of perspectives. Through this multidisciplinary collection of articles, we learn how the myth has come about, what sort of theory and empirical evidence have been generated to refute it, and how this myth has stubbornly persisted to hamper progress in a number of scholarly areas. But perhaps most importantly, this volume presents in a detailed manner how different academic disciplines go about analyzing historical and empirical data in order to arrive at new knowledge.

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Pathways V. 05 Pedagogy of African Languages
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CH. 1 African Language Field Development CH. 2 The State of African Language Instruction in the U.S.: An Inventory of Programs, Assets, and Resources CH. 3 Focus on Teaching CH. 4 Focus on the African Language Learner CH. 5 A Goal-Based Approach to African Language Instruction CH. 6 Toward Cultural Proficiency in African Languages CH. 7 The Use of Audio-Visual and Emerging Technologies CH. 8 A Twenty-First Century Vision for African Language Instruction and Learning ISBN: 978-0-87415-174-9

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Pathways V. 04 Learner, Text and Context: An Arabic Perspective
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Contents: CH. 1 Language Learning Strategies of Successful Learners CH. 2 Reading Strategies of Elementary and Advanced Learners: Effects of CALL Coding Options on Comprehension CH. 3 Impact of the Linguistic Situation in the Target Culture on Teaching the Language Abroad: The Case of Arabic Diglossia CH. 4 The Construct of the Educated Native Speaker of Arabic: Implications for Curriculum Design CH. 5 Computer-Assisted Language Learning: Linkage Between Learning and Research CH. 6 Models of Foreign Language Acquisition and the Meaning-Form Relationship CH. 7 Curriculum Design: Theoretical Bases and Implications CH. 8 Assessment of Functional Language Abilities Appendix A: A Typology of Learning Strategies Appendix B: Foreign Language Learning Strategies Appendix C: Guidelines for Writing the Language Learning Journal Appendix D: Selected Questions Asked in the Oral Interviews Appendix E: A List of Colloquial Lexical Items in the Speech of Native Speakers in a Formal Situation Appendix F: Transliteration Key

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Upcoming Events
Oct
2020
3
Arizona
Workshop
Webinar: Transformative Learning in a Social Justice Oriented Language Classroom

Webinar presented by Stacey Margarita Johnson (Vanderbilt University). Instructors building social justice into their language teaching often report that they hope their language classrooms will be sites of transformative learning and personal growth. As teachers, we want our teaching to make the world better and inspire students to become engaged citizens. Although we might hope for transformative learning, we don’t always know how it happens or how to guide our students through the process of transformation. This webinar will explore the steps in transformative learning, its connection to critical pedagogy and social justice, and, most importantly, ways language teachers can promote transformative learning through instructional choices that align with research and best practices in second language acquisition.

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Oct
2020
17
Arizona
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Webinar: Some Considerations for Social Justice Teaching in a World Language Setting: From Self to Students to World

Webinar presented by Michelle Nicola (Portland Public Schools). What do we mean when we say that we are social justice educators? What are concrete actions that social justice educators take? What beliefs or mindsets do we adopt? This webinar will help educators define what they mean by social justice education, and offer suggestions for how to incorporate self-reflection, relationship building & curriculum design as tools to recognize and interrupt inequitable patterns and practices in our world language classrooms and beyond. Participants will also receive a few lesson plan ideas that they can build on to meet their own communities’ social justice goals.

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Oct
2020
19 - 24
Arizona
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L2DL 2020: Critical Transnational Dialogue and Virtual Exchange

Accessible entirely online, the L2 Digital Literacies Symposium (L2DL) is a biennial international event offering an array of synchronous and asynchronous sessions that allow academics to make connections across the globe. In 2020, the conference focuses upon the theme of Critical Transnational Dialogue and Virtual Exchange, and explores intersections between international education, digital literacies, and virtual exchange. Virtual presentations selected from submitted proposals will be available during the week of October 19-24, and attendees are encouraged to participate in synchronous and asynchronous discussion that will take place through October 23; professional development credentials will be provided for presenters and attendees who participate in these activities. The symposium will culminate in livestreamed, invited presentations that will take place on October 23 and 24. The symposium schedule and presentation details are on the L2DL website. Access all the details and the link to registration there.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

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