Title Format Sponsor
The Power of Project-Based Language Learning (PBLL) (2017 Online Symposium)
Audio-Visual
Web

Description

Project-based Language Learning (PBLL) means much more than having students create an advertisement, develop a review game, make a poster, or give a presentation. Rigorous PBLL requires a deep understanding of Gold Standard PBL (Buck Institute for Education, 2015), with special attention to the principles of Sustained Inquiry, Authenticity, Reflection, and A Public Audience. In the world language classroom, PBLL offers a framework for designing powerful, culturally contextualized language learning experiences that support learners in using their language to address “real world” needs/purposes that are personally meaningful to them. PBLL also presents unique challenges when compared to project-based learning (PBL) in other disciplines because the very means by which learners engage in project work--the target language--is also the object of their learning. On January 11-12, 2017, the Project-Based Language Learning (PBLL) Symposium brought together language educators, policymakers, researchers, and innovators for conversations regarding the potential of PBLL to enhance and transform language education. This unique, FREE online event provided attendees with a broad overview of PBLL, engaging interactions with world language teachers who have implemented PBLL in their classrooms, and the chance to network with professionals who are passionate about this topic. Four interactive sessions were distributed across two days (i.e., two sessions per day) and recorded. The video and presentation slides are available as open educational resources (OERs).

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Project-Based Language Learning: Inspiring Teachers, Transforming Learning (2016 Online Symposium)
Audio-Visual
Web

Description

On January 12-15, 2016, the Project-Based Language Learning (PBLL) Symposium brought together experts, educational leaders, and world language teachers to foster the conversation on the potential for PBLL to transform and enhance language education. PBLL's intersections with content-based instruction, task-based language learning, and performance assessment make it an ideal conduit to ground language learning on real needs and measurable outcomes. We invited language educators, policymakers, researchers, and innovators to join the conversation and help further refine the PBLL framework by anchoring it to issues and ideas that are relevant to language education. This unique FREE online event provided attendees not only invaluable opportunities to access expertise in PBLL and engage in thought-provoking and constructive dialogues, but also a chance to network with professionals who are passionate about this topic. Eight engaging presentations were distributed across four days (i.e., two sessions per day) and recorded. The videos and presentation slides are available below as open educational resources (OERs).

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Korean for Professionals Volume 3
Print

Description

The Korean Language Flagship Center aims to produce professionals who can function in Korean in their chosen fields. After two years of intensive Korean language training customized to their fields, graduates of this program are expected to take their place among the next generation of global professionals as Korea specialists, commanding professional-level proficiency in Korean. Successful completion of the program and demonstration of the ability to use Korean at a professional level (ILR 3, ACTFL Superior) lead to the Master of Arts degree in Korean for Professionals. This monograph series is a compilation of the students’ research critical and controversial issues in Korea or Korea-US relations.

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Upcoming Events
Apr
2021
16
Utah
Workshop
How to Improve 2nd Language Reading Fluency and Word Recognition (Chinese Language)

Reading fluently in a foreign or second language can be challenging. Past research has shown that reading fluency can influence word recognition and comprehension, but few action research projects have examined reading fluency. This session will report the results of a recently published study (Journal of Immersion and Content-Based Education) that investigated the effects of timed, repeated readings and peer assisted learning strategies (PALS) with Chinese Foreign Language (CFL) learners. Results showed that the PALS group scored significantly better on tests of reading fluency,character recognition, and comprehension than the control group. In addition, a survey that examined students’ attitudes towards literacy revealed that the PALS students reported significantly higher levels of confidence and enjoyment of reading. Session participants will learn how to develop and teach the PALS intervention and how to situate reading fluency within a comprehensive literacy program. This webinar is applicable for all Chinese teachers in different fields including DLI and general world language. THE WEBINAR IS FREE BUT REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED.

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Apr
2021
21
Arizona
Workshop
Webinar- Translation in the Multilingual Language Classroom: Rationale, Roles and Activity Design

A webinar presented by Sonia Colina and Sara Albrecht, University of Arizona. Pedagogical translation is making a comeback in the multilingual language classroom as an activity that promotes literacy, metalinguistic and cultural awareness, translanguaging, language diversity, and community engagement. While theoretical papers on this topic are becoming more common, practical guidance for teachers on how to incorporate translation in their curriculum in an informed manner is scarce. This presentation will help teachers understand the historical context that banned translation, the justification for its reintroduction, and the roles translation can serve in language learning. Participants will be guided through sample activities and will learn basic steps to design translation activities that meet their learning goals. This webinar is part of a larger CERCLL project, Cross-Cultural Thinking Through Translation and Interpretation

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May
2021
8
Arizona
Workshop
Webinar- Vlogging Abroad: L2 Multimodal Composing for Language Learning and Cultural Reflection

Webinar presented by Natalie Amgott, a doctoral candidate in Second Language Acquisition and Teaching at the University of Arizona. In the twenty-first century, the growing importance of multicultural and multilingual competences is undeniable in our global economy (Douglas Fir Group, 2016). While decades of educators have called for channeling the “multi” into our modes, genres, and registers of language teaching materials (e.g., the New London Group, 1996), little research exists on how multimodal composing can mediate expansion of linguistic and cultural repertoire in L2 contexts outside of EFL and ESL (Kumagai et al., 2015; Schmerbeck & Lucht, 2017). In this webinar, postsecondary instructors and administrators of world languages will learn how to leverage multimodal composing for language learning and cultural reflection in study abroad contexts. A brief overview of how multimodal composing has been applied to EFL and ESL contexts will highlight how multimodal projects support academic learning (Pacheco et al., 2017), self-reflection (DeJaynes, 2015), and multilingual identities (Cummins et al., 2015). Amgott will then illustrate how the findings in EFL and literacy research can be translated to the postsecondary study abroad arena. Attendees will learn about the importance of modeling and scaffolding for fostering engagement and access to full multilingual and multimodal repertoires through multimodal composing (Pacheco & Smith, 2015; Smith et al., 2017) and discuss how multimodal and technological workshops can be coupled with discussion of the vlog genre in order for students to reflexively explore their study abroad environment. After this session, attendees will be able to apply their understanding of multimodality and their course context(s) to encourage students to use multimodal vlogging to reflect on cultural and socioemotional experiences, to develop metalinguistic awareness, and to promote goal-setting and accountability in the language learning community. This event is one in a two-part webinar series on exploring Intercultural communication in the L2 classroom.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

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Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
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The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
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