Title Format Sponsor
Foreign Languages and the Literary in the Everyday (FLLITE)
Web

Description

The FLLITE website provides a collection of literacy lessons for various languages. The FLLITE Project takes the creative moments found in everyday language use as the basis for lessons in second language literacy. By emphasizing language play as central to communication, FLLITE lessons aim to develop language awareness as well as communicative abilities through the integration of speaking, reading, listening, and writing tasks. The goal of the FLLITE Project is the publication of lessons based on authentic texts in both commonly and less-commonly taught languages, for example, blogs, Internet memes, YouTube videos, slam poetry, and so forth. When you submit a lesson, the FLLITE editorial board will give you feedback to improve your lesson for publication. In addition, you will learn how to adopt an open copyright license (Creative Commons) that gives the public the right to access, adapt, and re-use your lesson. FLLITE is sponsored by CERCLL (University of Arizona) and COERLL (University of Texas at Austin).

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Pragmatics & Language Learning, Vol. 14, 2016
Print

Description

This volume contains a selection of papers presented at the 2014 International Conference of Pragmatics and Language Learning at Indiana University. It includes fourteen papers on a variety of topics, with a diversity of first and second languages, and a wide range of methods used to collect pragmatic data in L2 and FL settings. This volume is divided into three main sections: Acquisition of Second-Language Pragmatics, Research in Pedagogical Contexts, and Brief Summaries and Reports. The articles advance our understanding of second language pragmatics with regard to learning and the use of pragmalinguistic resources necessary to produce and comprehend speech acts, conventional expressions, discourse markers, relational talk to develop L2 symbolic competence, and polite expressions in language textbooks.

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Example Student Learning Outcome (SLO) Statements from U.S. College Language Programs
Web

Description

This resource presents a collection of student learning outcome (SLO) statements (i.e., language knowledge, skills, and dispositions) from college world/foreign language programs. Languages include French, German, Spanish, Italian, Korean, Japanese, Chinese, Russian, Classical languages, Persian, Arabic, and Hebrew. SLO statements are grouped by program level: major, minor, first year sequence, second year sequence, and general education language requirement.

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Upcoming Events
Nov
2020
7
Arizona
Workshop
Webinar: Crafting Compelling Experiences: The Power of Stories, Scaffolding, & Sharing

Presented by Cherice Montgomery, Assistant Professor of Spanish Pedagogy at Brigham Young University. Filmmakers are experts at producing memorable movies that educate, entertain, and inspire their audiences. Teachers have similar goals, but sometimes hesitate to engage learners with authentic texts or “real life issues,” fearing that the necessary language will be too complex for them to understand. During this 90-minute, interactive webinar, you will: (1) learn a step-by-step process for skillfully integrating culturally authentic texts into meaningful interpretive communication activities; (2) explore effective techniques for supporting learners’ comprehension; (3) experience interactive activities for assessing learners’ understanding. Bring your textbook, a lesson you’d like to improve, and your creativity!

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Nov
2020
18
Arizona
Workshop
Webinar: Multimodal Pedagogies in the L2 Classroom: Moving from Language to a Communication Paradigm

Presented by José Aldemar Álvarez Valencia, Ph.D., professor of applied linguistics in the School of Language Sciences at Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia. The current communication landscape shows that communication is multimodal by nature. This new perspective on language and communication impacts directly second language acquisition and pedagogical practices. Multimodal pedagogies intend to bring this perspective into second/foreign language classrooms by highlighting the centrality of modes of communication and transmodal practices in the design of tasks that engage learners in processes of language/communication appropriation. By looking at language as one more semiotic resource among many others that make up communication ecologies, multimodal pedagogies recognize and look for ways to articulate and rearticulate students’ cultural semiotic resources, including their languages, their embodied communicative practices, and their identity affiliations. In this webinar, participants will be introduced to the main concepts of multimodal pedagogies such as design, modes, semiotic resources, and transmodality. Likewise, the presenter will discuss the main principles of this new approach, followed by some examples on how it can be implemented in a language/communication classroom.

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Dec
2020
5
Arizona
Workshop
Webinar: Re-Envisioning Writing Instruction Using a Design Approach

Webinar presented by Heather Willis Allen (University of Wisconsin-Madison). Writing is a critical skill in personal, educational, and professional domains, yet its role in L2 (second language) education in the United States is unclear and several recent studies have identified presentational writing as the most difficult modality to teach and the one that students struggle with the most. In this 90-minute webinar, we will explore the principles of Design writing instruction and discuss pedagogical examples of how this approach can be used to integrate L2 reading and writing, to facilitate learners’ familiarity with and use of appropriate L2 writing conventions, and to foster dialogue around the process and products of L2 writing. For the application stage of this workshop, please bring a presentational writing assignment that you have used in the past and want to improve or revise.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
  • Research
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  • Digital tools and resources
  • Assessment
  • Professional development
  • Less commonly taught languages initiatives
  • K-12 initiatives
  • Outreach and dissemination

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You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

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The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
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