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Struggling Learners and Language Immersion Education
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This handbook provides dual language and immersion educators with rich information and practical resources that address common concerns with children who struggle with language, literacy and learning. It includes: Real Stories—case narratives that recount lived experiences with struggling learners from a range of educational specialists, administrators and teachers; Background information and research summaries that provide important information about the existing knowledge base on this topic; Discussion of issues as they relate to language minority and language majority learners; Guiding principles to inform program policies and practices; Reference materials and useful web resources to assist educators in meeting the needs of a wide variety of language and learning challenges.

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Developing Classroom Materials for Less Commonly Taught Languages website
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Description

To address the challenges LCTL teachers face in developing instructional materials, the LCTL Project created a new website offering LCTL teachers the background and tools needed to create high quality materials. The site features videos of leading language teacher educator Bill Johnston presenting concepts for material development from a variety of resources, as he interacts with LCTL teachers. The videos show pairs of LCTL teachers as they work through example activities using the materials as if they were students, and then discuss those activities from the teacher viewpoint. Each video segment is accompanied by pre-viewing questions for teachers, and includes additional questions for reflection after watching. The website is organized into units focused on using written texts, literature, audio, video and pictures. The Developing Classroom Materials for LCTLs website is available free of charge at: http://www.carla.umn.edu/lctl/development/index.html

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Learner Language: Tools for Teachers Website--Multimedia Activities
Web

Description

The learner language website provides a wealth of information for teachers of all languages on learner language, error analysis, interlanguage, referential communication, and complexity. Another section gives practical information on designing interactive communication tasks that invite learners to use their second language in meaningful, unrehearsed communication. This site also showcases video recordings of learners using Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Persian, and Spanish in unrehearsed interaction. Eight videos for each language show two language learners perform 6 communication tasks, plus individual interviews. Multimedia activities guide language teachers to study and reflect on learner language from five perspectives. The activities in this section provide video recordings of 10 language learners doing communication tasks -- two learners each in Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Persian and Spanish. Teachers are guided in analyzing video clips of learner language through multimedia interactive activities, and asked to consider the implications of their analysis for their own pedagogy. These multimedia activities are designed to provide language teachers with a better understanding of the way learner language develops. This understanding will help them adjust their teaching to maximize student achievement. This approach, first used for teachers of English in Tarone & Swierzbin (2009), is extended here to support teachers of five languages: Mandarin Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Persian (Farsi), and Spanish.

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Upcoming Events
Sep
2021
29
Arizona
Workshop
Translating Google Translate: Instructional Strategies for Machine Translation in the Language Classroom

Webinar presented by Emily Hellmich (University of Arizona) and Kimberly Vinall (DeAnza College). Google Translate and other machine translation platforms can be a source of strife and confusion in language learning classrooms. Many instructors wonder if and how to handle these platforms with their students. This webinar presents a series of instructional strategies for how to approach machine translation platforms in the language classroom. These strategies come from findings of a research study that used screen recording and retrospective interviews to observe how foreign language learners (French, Spanish, Mandarin) actually use machine translation platforms while completing a writing task. In the webinar, we present key findings from the study and explore the implications they have for instructional practices. By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to: 1) broadly describe how students actually use machine translation; 2) identify a range of instructional strategies in three areas (training, assignment creation, policies); and 3) reflect on how to integrate take-ways from the webinar into their own teaching/learning contexts.

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Nov
2021
6
Arizona
Workshop
Building Bridges Across Cultures through Global Inquiry with Children

A webinar presented by Kathy G. Short and Dorea Kleker (University of Arizona). In our interconnected world, an understanding of global cultures has become a necessity as children are challenged to think and act globally. Our inquiry as educators is on creating instructional strategies that encourage children to develop open-minded perspectives toward ways of living that differ from their own. We invite children to engage in inquiries around specific cultures, while trying to avoid the pitfalls of only exploring surface aspects of a culture and not the deeper values and beliefs that underlie easily observable traditions and actions. Our goal is that children develop an orientation on the world that balances reflection on the known through identifying their loyalties with reflection on the new through developing open-minded perspectives. In this webinar, we share the instructional strategies and frameworks we have developed in working with elementary children to explore their cultural identities and to engage them in inquiries on specific global cultures, such as Korea and India. These inquiries are supported through global children’s literature and a range of interactive experiences. We will provide examples of children’s use of thinking routines, instructional strategies, and children’s books as well as engage participants in trying out several strategies.

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Jan
2022
27 - 30
Arizona
Conference
2022 Intercultural Competence Conference

ICC 2022: Decentering Mobility in Intercultural Education: Engagement, Equity and Access Extended Proposal Submission Deadline June 21, 2021 A hybrid event, in Tucson, Arizona, and online, with plenary speakers: * Uju Anya, Pennsylvania State University, USA * Maria Dasli, University of Edinburgh, Scotland * Jennifer Pipitone, College of Mount Saint Vincent, USA In January 2022, the eighth International Conference on the Development and Assessment of Intercultural Competence (ICC) will be a hybrid event on the theme of "Decentering Mobility in Intercultural Education: Engagement, Equity and Access." Presentations will focus on the ways in which intercultural communication and the teaching and learning thereof have been shaped through mobility – both virtual and physical. Of particular interest are contributions that address how the changing state of intercultural communication has been shaped by a world that is simultaneously more and less mobile, for example, due to differences in access among learners or to changing circumstances, such as the current global health crisis. Proposals will be submitted as one of five types: paper presentation, symposium, roundtable discussion, poster, and workshop. See the complete submission guidelines for more about the conference theme and the format of these presentations, proposal restrictions and limitations, access to the online proposal submission form, and notification dates, etc. Proposal Submission Deadline: June 4, 2021. Full Call for Proposals and Submission Guidelines: https://icc.arizona.edu/2022cfp/ Registration for ICC 2020 will open in the Fall.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
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  • Professional development
  • Less commonly taught languages initiatives
  • K-12 initiatives
  • Outreach and dissemination

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You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

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The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
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