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Gurage Brochure
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The languages spoken by the Gurage are known as the Gurage languages. The variations among these languages are used to group the Gurage people into three dialectically varied subgroups:Northern, Eastern and Western. However, the largest group within Eastern subgroup, known as the Silt’e, are identified foremost as Muslims . The Gurage live a sedentary life based on agriculture, involving a complex system of crop rotation and transplanting. Ensete is their main staple crop, but other cash crops are grown, which include coffee and Khat. Animal husbandry is practiced, but mainly for milk supply and dung. Other foods consumed include green cabbage, cheese, butter, and roasted grains with meat consumption being very limited

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Gbaya Brochure
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The Gbaya are also known as the Baya, the Mbere Baya or the Gbaya-Bossangoa. They are the largest ethnic group in the Central African Republic. The Gbaya are closely related to the Mandija people (also called Mandja). In 1880 the fled Fulani slave raids an holy wars (Jihad) connected with the founding of the Sokoto Caliphate; the ancestors of the Gbaya migrated to the region from present-day northern Cameroon and Nigeria in the early 1800s. They incorporated many of the indigenous nhabitants creating the six basic subgroups of the Gbaya. Fulani continued to raid the Gbaya region each year to capture slaves for sale both in the Caliphate and to the rans-Saharan caravans

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Ebira Brochure
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Ebira means behaviour when translated literally with ethics and hospitality as compliments. The unique features of Ebira culture with its ethnic aestheticism are appreciated most in the event of traditional marriages. Ebira people are republican by nature, outspoken and very hard working. Farming and cloth- weaving are occupations for which the Ebiras are well known. Primary crops grown for export are yam and cassava. Guinea corn is an important local commodity as the staple of most meals and is used in the brewing of beer. Due to abundance of rivers and streams on the Niger-Benue plateau, fishing is conducted by individual households. In recent years, larger fish farms have been developed by private and public firms.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
  • Research
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  • Assessment
  • Professional development
  • Less commonly taught languages initiatives
  • K-12 initiatives
  • Outreach and dissemination

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You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

Funding

The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
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