Title Format Sponsor
Nubian Brochure
Web

Description

The Nubians have had a strong interest in archeological discoveries of recent decades that have brought a richer knowledge of ancient Nubia. Nubians were often subjected to discrimination in Egypt before this research became widely known. Nubians now take pride in their cultural history.

Resource Link
Meru Brochure
Web

Description

Meru is the language spoken by the Meru people (Ameru) who live on the Eastern and Northern slopes of Mount Kenya, Kenya, Africa and on the Nyambene ranges. They settled in this area after centuries of migration from the north. The Meru people are a fairly homogeneous community and all share a common ancestry. They speak same language, Kimeru, but there are some slight regional differences, in accent and local words. The community comprises the following subdivisions; from the north to south: * Igembe * Tigania (Tiania) * Imenti * Tharaka (Saraka) * Igoji * Mwimbi–Muthambi * Chuka (Gicuka)

Resource Link
Makonde
Web

Description

The Makonde people are believed to have originated from the Ndonde area of northern Mozambique. A large group then migrated into southern Tanzania during the 1700 and 1800s. The Makonde were said to have migrated to avoid becoming enslaved by the Ngoni tribe fleeing war in Zululand. Although there are varying accounts, the Makonde traditional creation myth generally holds that a man living in the bush carved a human figure from wood and set it down. Overnight, the figure came to life . After two miscarriages, the woman finally gave birth to a boy. This third child survived and was considered to be the first Makonde child.

Resource Link
3 of 702
Show all
Show free resources only
Show less
Show more
Your search did not return any results. Please change your search criteria.
All LRCs
Previous LRC
Next LRC
In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
  • Research
  • Teaching materials
  • Digital tools and resources
  • Assessment
  • Professional development
  • Less commonly taught languages initiatives
  • K-12 initiatives
  • Outreach and dissemination

Contact Us

You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

Funding

The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
© Title VI Language Resource Centers