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Dynamic Assessment in the Language Classroom
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CALPER Professional Development Document - 8pp. In very clear language, the authors provide a basic account of Dynamic Assessment (DA) and trace its origins to Vygotsky's theory of development. They explain the concepts of mediation and Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD), as well as the two main approaches used in DA. They also include three examples detailing what DA looks like in the classroom and conclude the document by providing a glimpse of what the future holds for DA, such as using it with groups and integrating computer technologies to DA procedures.

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Heritage Language Journal
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HLJ, an online, blind-refereed journal, was established in 2002 to provide a forum for scholars to publish the results of their research and to advance knowledge about educating heritage speakers. HLJ is published jointly by the Center for World Languages of UCLA and the UC Consortium for Language Learning and Teaching and is housed on a server hosted by the UCLA International Institute. The journal seeks submissions from researchers and practitioners in: - linguistics & applied linguistics -psychology - sociology - language education - language policy - other relevant fields The editors also welcome proposals for special issues focused on a single language or topic.

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Heritage Language Survey Report
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The goal of the survey is to collect information from Heritage Language Learners currently enrolled in post-secondary heritage language courses to better understand their backgrounds, attitudes, and goals in studying their heritage language. The data collected will inform the NHLRC in designing heritage language curricular materials, as well as heritage language professional development projects.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

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Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
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  • Professional development
  • Less commonly taught languages initiatives
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  • Outreach and dissemination

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The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
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