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A focus on language test development: Expanding the language proficiency construct across a variety of tests
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This volume presents eight research studies which introduce a variety of novel, non-traditional forms of second and foreign language assessment. To the extent possible, the studies also show the entire test development process, warts and all. These language testing projects not only demonstrate many of the types of problems that test developers run into in the real world but also afford the reader unique insights into the language test development process.

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Language Learning & Technology: A refereed journal for second and foreign language educators
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Language Learning & Technology (LLT) is a refereed journal that began publication in July 1997. It comes out three times a year in January, May, and September. The journal seeks to disseminate research to foreign and second language educators in the US and around the world on issues related to technology and language education. Language Learning & Technology is currently sponsored and funded by the National Foreign Language Resource Center (NFLRC) and the Center for Language & Technology (CLT) at University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, and the Center for Open Educational Resources and Language Learning (COERLL) at the University of Texas at Austin. In its early beginnings, the journal started as a project sponsored by the NFLRC and the Center for Language Education and Research (CLEAR) at Michigan State University and co-sponsored by Apprentissage des Langues et Systèmes d'Information et de Communication (ALSIC), the Australian Technology Enhanced Language Learning Consortium (ATELL), the Center for Applied Linguistics (CAL), the Computer Assisted Language Instruction Consortium (CALICO), the European Association for Computer Assisted Language Learning (EUROCALL), the International Association for Language Learning Technology (IALLT), and the University of Minnesota Center for Advanced Research on Language Acquisition (CARLA).

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Designing second language performance assessments
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This technical report focuses on the decision-making potential provided by second language performance assessments. The authors first situate performance assessment within a broader discussion of alternatives in language assessment and in educational assessment in general. They then discuss issues in performance assessment design, implementation, reliability, and validity. Finally, they present a prototype framework for second language performance assessment based on the integration of theoretical underpinnings and research findings from the task-based language teaching literature, the language testing literature, and the educational measurement literature. The authors outline test and item specifications, and they present numerous examples of prototypical language tasks. They also propose a research agenda focusing on the operationalization of second language performance assessments.

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Upcoming Events
Dec
2020
5
Arizona
Workshop
Webinar: Re-Envisioning Writing Instruction Using a Design Approach

Webinar presented by Heather Willis Allen (University of Wisconsin-Madison). Writing is a critical skill in personal, educational, and professional domains, yet its role in L2 (second language) education in the United States is unclear and several recent studies have identified presentational writing as the most difficult modality to teach and the one that students struggle with the most. In this 90-minute webinar, we will explore the principles of Design writing instruction and discuss pedagogical examples of how this approach can be used to integrate L2 reading and writing, to facilitate learners’ familiarity with and use of appropriate L2 writing conventions, and to foster dialogue around the process and products of L2 writing. For the application stage of this workshop, please bring a presentational writing assignment that you have used in the past and want to improve or revise.

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Mar
2021
4 - 7
Hawaii
Call for Papers
CALL FOR PAPERS: 7th International Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation (ICLDC): Recognizing Relationships

ICLDC 2021: GENERAL SESSION PROPOSALS (PAPERS & POSTERS – DEADLINE: SEPTEMBER 30, 2020) While we especially welcome abstracts that address the conference theme, we also welcome abstracts on other subjects in language documentation and conservation, which may include but are not limited to: - Archiving and mobilizing language materials - Ethical issues - Indigenous language education - Indigenous sign languages - Language and its relation to health and well being - Language planning - Language reclamation and revitalization - Language work in the era of covid-19 - Lexicography, grammar, orthography and corpus design - Multidisciplinary language documentation - Successful models of documentation - Technology in documentation and reclamation - Topics in areal language documentation - Training and capacity building in language work - Other PRESENTATION FORMATS Papers: To allow for as many presentations as possible, we have decided that all 20-minute paper presentations will be pre-recorded and uploaded to a platform (to be announced) a few weeks before the beginning of the conference. Conference participants will then have an opportunity to watch presentations before the beginning of the conference. During the conference itself, each paper presentation will be given scheduled time for questions and discussion synchronously over Zoom (details of the discussion period will be announced in October 2020). We are also exploring different ways of encouraging interaction asynchronously (e.g., by posting comments and questions) or synchronously throughout the conference. Posters: To allow for as many poster presentations as possible, posters will be uploaded as a PDF a few weeks prior to the beginning of the conference. Poster presenters will have the option of uploading an accompanying 10 minute audio/video recording walking participants through the poster. Poster presenters will also have the opportunity to interact with participants at a scheduled time during the conference. All paper and poster presentations will be archived in ScholarSpace, the University of Hawaii Repository, for continued viewing after the end of the ICLDC. For more details or to submit a proposal, visit http://ling.lll.hawaii.edu/sites/icldc/call-for-proposals/papers-posters/

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Mar
2021
4 - 7
Hawaii
Conference
7th International Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation (ICLDC): Recognizing Relationships

RECOGNIZING RELATIONSHIPS The 7th International Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation (ICLDC) University of Hawaii at Manoa March 4-7, 2021 COVID-19 STATEMENT Due to COVID-19, ICLDC 2021 will be held virtually. The ICLDC 7 organizers are excited about this year’s theme, and the possibilities for broad international discussion that an online conference can offer. We are currently investigating what technologies we will use and how the conference will take shape and how we can accommodate time zone differences for presenters, as well as family and work obligations. We look forward to your participation. Please “join” us! CONFERENCE THEME: RECOGNIZING RELATIONSHIPS There are many critical challenges that endangered language documentation and conservation faces, some of which seem insurmountable, and despite linguists’ best efforts, many of the proposed solutions fall short. These challenges have been apparent to many communities, language activists and academic linguists since (or even before) the earliest public warnings of the “endangered language crisis” in the early 1990’s, and recognition of the great number of large-scale challenges has only become more apparent since. One reason that many of the current solutions have not reached the level of success to which they have aspired is that the need to identify and/or foster relationships is often minimized or even ignored completely. Identifying and fostering relationships by taking the time to build understanding between stakeholders, learning about needs and skills that can be offered, and developing shared goals and outcomes are central to sustainable solutions for language documentation and conservation. These relationships go beyond those between communities and linguists and extend to multi-party relationships among linguists, communities, other academic fields, governmental and non-governmental organizations, educational and funding agencies, and many other individuals invested in the future of the language. There are also important intra-group relationships within these stakeholding groups (e.g., between members of an Indigenous community, or language workers documenting signed languages and those documenting spoken languages) as well as inter-group relationships between different Indigenous communities. At ICLDC 2021 we propose to initiate a dialogue on how recognizing relationships can help overcome the many critical challenges in language documentation and language reclamation. We believe that this focus will lead to improved connections among academic linguists, various communities, researchers from other disciplines, educational practitioners, and many other stakeholders. We specifically aim to draw attention to the transformative power of recognizing relationships to overcome critical challenges. For more information, visit our conference website: http://ling.lll.hawaii.edu/sites/icldc/

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
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You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

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The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
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