Title Format Sponsor
CALPER Language Advocacy Site
Web

Description

CALPER collected and compiled materials that will help language educators, administrators, parents, and students to advocate for language learning and filed them under several categories: opinion pieces and news stories published in the press; websites advocating for a particular language; web pages from departments in colleges and universities; flyers, brochures, infographics; videos.

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CLTNet Resource Portal
Web

Description

CLTNet of PA is an initiative spearheaded by CALPER that will support teachers of Chinese in the state of Pennsylvania. The resource portal provides references to quality teaching resources and a professional resources for teachers. While the teaching resources are of interest to all teachers of Chinese, the professional resources contain a large amount of information that is specific to educators teaching in the state of Pennsylvania.

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Perform Suzhou: a Course in Intermediate to Advanced Spoken Mandarin
Print

Description

Perform Suzhou is a set of instructional and learning materials designed for CFL(Chinese as a foreign language) learners at beginning-intermediate to beginning advanced levels. The main objectives are to train learners to develop transferable strategies and skills for effective performance in Chinese by engaging them in various aspects and levels of a real and specific Chinese community. The textbook has 8 units covering topics relevant to non-native learners participating in a target culture community. Each unit consists of 3 stages and each stage further includes 8 sections reflecting different steps in a learning process leading to the acquisition as well as expansion of new knowledge and skill. The textbook is accompanied with comprehensive audio materials covering all dialogues, narratives, drills and exercises.

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Upcoming Events
Dec
2020
5
Arizona
Workshop
Webinar: Re-Envisioning Writing Instruction Using a Design Approach

Webinar presented by Heather Willis Allen (University of Wisconsin-Madison). Writing is a critical skill in personal, educational, and professional domains, yet its role in L2 (second language) education in the United States is unclear and several recent studies have identified presentational writing as the most difficult modality to teach and the one that students struggle with the most. In this 90-minute webinar, we will explore the principles of Design writing instruction and discuss pedagogical examples of how this approach can be used to integrate L2 reading and writing, to facilitate learners’ familiarity with and use of appropriate L2 writing conventions, and to foster dialogue around the process and products of L2 writing. For the application stage of this workshop, please bring a presentational writing assignment that you have used in the past and want to improve or revise.

Event Link
Mar
2021
4 - 7
Hawaii
Call for Papers
CALL FOR PAPERS: 7th International Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation (ICLDC): Recognizing Relationships

ICLDC 2021: GENERAL SESSION PROPOSALS (PAPERS & POSTERS – DEADLINE: SEPTEMBER 30, 2020) While we especially welcome abstracts that address the conference theme, we also welcome abstracts on other subjects in language documentation and conservation, which may include but are not limited to: - Archiving and mobilizing language materials - Ethical issues - Indigenous language education - Indigenous sign languages - Language and its relation to health and well being - Language planning - Language reclamation and revitalization - Language work in the era of covid-19 - Lexicography, grammar, orthography and corpus design - Multidisciplinary language documentation - Successful models of documentation - Technology in documentation and reclamation - Topics in areal language documentation - Training and capacity building in language work - Other PRESENTATION FORMATS Papers: To allow for as many presentations as possible, we have decided that all 20-minute paper presentations will be pre-recorded and uploaded to a platform (to be announced) a few weeks before the beginning of the conference. Conference participants will then have an opportunity to watch presentations before the beginning of the conference. During the conference itself, each paper presentation will be given scheduled time for questions and discussion synchronously over Zoom (details of the discussion period will be announced in October 2020). We are also exploring different ways of encouraging interaction asynchronously (e.g., by posting comments and questions) or synchronously throughout the conference. Posters: To allow for as many poster presentations as possible, posters will be uploaded as a PDF a few weeks prior to the beginning of the conference. Poster presenters will have the option of uploading an accompanying 10 minute audio/video recording walking participants through the poster. Poster presenters will also have the opportunity to interact with participants at a scheduled time during the conference. All paper and poster presentations will be archived in ScholarSpace, the University of Hawaii Repository, for continued viewing after the end of the ICLDC. For more details or to submit a proposal, visit http://ling.lll.hawaii.edu/sites/icldc/call-for-proposals/papers-posters/

Event Link
Mar
2021
4 - 7
Hawaii
Conference
7th International Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation (ICLDC): Recognizing Relationships

RECOGNIZING RELATIONSHIPS The 7th International Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation (ICLDC) University of Hawaii at Manoa March 4-7, 2021 COVID-19 STATEMENT Due to COVID-19, ICLDC 2021 will be held virtually. The ICLDC 7 organizers are excited about this year’s theme, and the possibilities for broad international discussion that an online conference can offer. We are currently investigating what technologies we will use and how the conference will take shape and how we can accommodate time zone differences for presenters, as well as family and work obligations. We look forward to your participation. Please “join” us! CONFERENCE THEME: RECOGNIZING RELATIONSHIPS There are many critical challenges that endangered language documentation and conservation faces, some of which seem insurmountable, and despite linguists’ best efforts, many of the proposed solutions fall short. These challenges have been apparent to many communities, language activists and academic linguists since (or even before) the earliest public warnings of the “endangered language crisis” in the early 1990’s, and recognition of the great number of large-scale challenges has only become more apparent since. One reason that many of the current solutions have not reached the level of success to which they have aspired is that the need to identify and/or foster relationships is often minimized or even ignored completely. Identifying and fostering relationships by taking the time to build understanding between stakeholders, learning about needs and skills that can be offered, and developing shared goals and outcomes are central to sustainable solutions for language documentation and conservation. These relationships go beyond those between communities and linguists and extend to multi-party relationships among linguists, communities, other academic fields, governmental and non-governmental organizations, educational and funding agencies, and many other individuals invested in the future of the language. There are also important intra-group relationships within these stakeholding groups (e.g., between members of an Indigenous community, or language workers documenting signed languages and those documenting spoken languages) as well as inter-group relationships between different Indigenous communities. At ICLDC 2021 we propose to initiate a dialogue on how recognizing relationships can help overcome the many critical challenges in language documentation and language reclamation. We believe that this focus will lead to improved connections among academic linguists, various communities, researchers from other disciplines, educational practitioners, and many other stakeholders. We specifically aim to draw attention to the transformative power of recognizing relationships to overcome critical challenges. For more information, visit our conference website: http://ling.lll.hawaii.edu/sites/icldc/

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

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