Title Format Sponsor
Digital Literacies and Technology-Enhanced Language Learning: Interdisciplinary and Interactions
Web

Description

As digital technologies continue to radically change the social acts of communication in which we engage, boundaries once taken for granted between various modes and medialities, between consumption and production have begun to break down. Digital, networked communication forms afford new literacies—new forms of interaction, meanings, and understandings of ourselves and the world around us; thus, they also demand new pedagogical approaches and perspectives. The Digital Literacies project arose as a way to provide educators, practitioners, and researchers a space in which to explore the wide array of practices captured by the concept of digital literacies as they relate to particular circumstances of learning and living in a second or additional language and culture: in October 2014, CERCLL hosted the first symposium in this series, “Digital Literacies in and Beyond the L2 Classroom”, with online posters accepted from among a pool of submissions and with opportunities for synchronous and asynchronous exchange with the authors, as well as an in-person event consisting of a roundtable discussion, keynote presentation, and assessment of the posters. The symposium takes place every two years, with two primary and interrelated goals: (1) to provide a forum within which various stakeholders (teachers, administrators, researchers) can consider how to integrate digital literacies into language classrooms, study abroad programs, and other forms of structured language learning, and (2) to provide a set of resources related to digital literacies and language teaching in the form of a web site, which will extend long beyond the symposium event itself.

Resource Link
PErCOLATE: A Multiliteracies Framework for Collegiate Foreign Language Teaching
Print
Mobile & Tablets

Description

Existing foreign language teacher training models focus on lower-level language acquisition, failing to prepare graduates for a world where language, literature and culture are inseparable in nature and significance. This project developed modular, multiliteracy-based professional development frameworks for teaching assistants that focuses on language teaching at higher levels, available on the project website, and resulted in a textbook, A Multiliteracies Framework for Collegiate Foreign Language Teaching (Pearson Higher Education, 2015).

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Globalizing the Common Core State Standards
Web

Description

This project addresses the outdated and ethnocentric cultural perspectives in the lists of exemplars of text complexity used in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), lists which are often used as core reading lists that do not reflect the kinds of cultural and global literacy needed in today’s world. The project has created carefully constructed grade-level lists of global fiction and nonfiction literature that match the required lexile levels. Of particular interest are books that include some use of a world language through codeswitching in dialogue or in terminology for objects, events, etc., since these books can foster interest in LCTLs (which are rarely taught in elementary schools) even at this young age. Books that can be used as paired texts with the existing books in the exemplar lists have been identified so that teachers required to use the original CCSS lists will be able to still use the global texts alongside them. The new book lists are available free for download, and in-service professional development opportunities for local teachers and a summer institute for a national audience in 2018 will support teachers in integrating these books into their curriculum while meeting the CCSS.

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Upcoming Events
Sep
2022
12 - 14
Hawaii
Call for Papers
2022 Pragmatics & Language Learning Conference

The National Foreign Language Resource Center at the University of Hawaii at Manoa and the Center for Applied Second Language Studies at the University of Oregon are pleased to announce the 2022 Pragmatics and Language Learning Conference (PLL 2022) which will take place online on September 12-14, 2022. The conference main theme will be Teaching and Learning Interactional Pragmatics in a Digital World, but we welcome a broad range of topics in pragmatics, discourse, interaction, and sociolinguistics in their relation to second and foreign language learning, education, and use, approached from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives. We hope this conference brings together scholars and educators from all around the world who are interested in discussing both established and innovative approaches to teaching and learning pragmatics to strengthen our understanding of principles and practices in PLL and push the field to new and exciting directions in research and practice. Plenary talks will be live and we have tried to schedule them so that a large part of our audience can access at least half of them. The rest of the presentations will be simulive (pre-recorded 20 minute presentation with live interaction by the presenters) or poster sessions (5-7 minute-pre-recorded presentation within Zoom breakout rooms for interaction). CALL FOR PROPOSALS The conference main theme will be Teaching and Learning Interactional Pragmatics in a Digital World, but we welcome a broad range of topics in pragmatics, discourse, interaction, and sociolinguistics in their relation to second and foreign language learning, education, and use, approached from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives. ONLINE ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS: DEADLINE: March 1, 2022 via EasyChair Visit our website [ https://bit.ly/PLL2022 ] for more information and instruction on how to prepare your abstract proposal.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

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Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
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You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

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The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
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