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Sepedi Brochure
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Like the Sotho and Tswana, the Pedi in pre-conquest times lived in large villages divided into groups centered on family clusters favoring paternal line. Each consisted of a group of households built around a central area which combined meeting place, cattle byre, graveyard and ancestral shrine. Homes were ranked in order of seniority. Each wife had her own round thatched homestead, joined to the others by a series of open-air enclosures (lapa) encircled by mud walls.

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Senufo Brochure
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The Senufo number 1,000,000 to 1,500,000 and live in Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Burkina Faso, and the extreme south of Mali. They live principally off agriculture fruits and occasionally hunting. Senufo agriculture is typical of the region, which includes millet, sorghum, maize, rice, and yams. Minimal amounts of hunting and fishing also contribute to the local economy. In addition to a belief in a creator deity, ancestors and nature spirits, a central concept in Senufo religion is a female ancestral spirit called “ancient mother” or “ancient woman,” the sacred guiding spirit of each poro society. All adult men belong to the poro society, which maintains the continuity of religious and historical traditions, especially through the cult of the ancestors.

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Gurage Brochure
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The languages spoken by the Gurage are known as the Gurage languages. The variations among these languages are used to group the Gurage people into three dialectically varied subgroups:Northern, Eastern and Western. However, the largest group within Eastern subgroup, known as the Silt’e, are identified foremost as Muslims . The Gurage live a sedentary life based on agriculture, involving a complex system of crop rotation and transplanting. Ensete is their main staple crop, but other cash crops are grown, which include coffee and Khat. Animal husbandry is practiced, but mainly for milk supply and dung. Other foods consumed include green cabbage, cheese, butter, and roasted grains with meat consumption being very limited

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

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