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Documenting and Revitalizing Austronesian Languages
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Description

The case studies in this volume lead to a discussion of changes in the field of linguistics and the alliances which are being built between linguists and community language activists. The 11 chapters in the book touch upon the key themes of international capacity building initiatives, documentation and revitalization activities, and computational methods and tools for language documentation. <a href="http://www.nflrc.hawaii.edu/ldc" target="blank"><i>Language Documentation & Conservation</a> Special Publication No. 1</i>

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Chinese as a heritage language: Fostering rooted world citizenry
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The authors examine the socio-cultural, cognitive-linguistic, and educational-institutional trajectories along which Chinese as a Heritage Language may be acquired, maintained, and developed. It draws upon developmental psychology, functional linguistics, linguistic and cultural anthropology, discourse analysis, orthography analysis, reading research, second language acquisition, and bilingualism. This volume aims to lay a foundation for theories, models, and master scripts to be discussed, debated, and developed, and to stimulate research and enhance teaching both within and beyond Chinese language education.

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Ngativerebge Shona
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Description

This book develops the linguistic and communicative skills of Shona learners. The book helps them attain a balanced, functional knowledge of the linguistic structures, broaden their vocabulary as well as be able to use these skills appropriately in practical life situations.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

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