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There Remain Words to Say
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This is the second volume of Songs of Thorns and Flowers: Bilingual Performance and Discourse on Modern Korean Poetry Series (2010- ), a pedagogical approach to modern Korean poetry for college-level studies of Korean language and literature. Volume Two, "There Remain Words to Say," features 35 translated poems of the 2010 Ku Sang Poet Laureate Yoo An-Jin. Reading poetry exposes the learner to the art of performativity in Korean language and culture. To make visible the rhetorical and semantic transfer from Korean to English, the original and the translated poems are laid side by side. Not only will learners of Korean benefit from the book but also Korean learners of English can observe how the nuances of poetry and language get translated from Korean to English. In order to give readers a stronger appreciation of the poet’s expressiveness, a section entitled “Replace with the poet’s words in Korean” is provided for most of the poems. Under the section “Discuss,” suggestions are given to stimulate discussion and further exploration. Historical explanations and annotations on language use are provided where appropriate. The included companion DVD features video interviews with the poet and audio recitations.

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Developing, using, and analyzing rubrics in language assessment with case studies in Asian and Pacific languages
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Rubrics are essential tools for all language teachers in this age of communicative and task-based teaching and assessment—tools that allow us to efficiently communicate to our students what we are looking for in the productive language abilities of speaking and writing and then effectively assess those abilities when the time comes for grading students, giving them feedback, placing them into new courses, and so forth. This book provides a wide array of ideas, suggestions, and examples (mostly from M?ori, Hawaiian, and Japanese language assessment projects) to help language educators effectively develop, use, revise, analyze, and report on rubric-based assessments.

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Integrated Performance Assessment (IPA) Units
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The Integrated Performance Assessment (IPA) is a cluster assessment featuring three tasks, each of which reflects one of the three modes of communication--Interpretive, Interpersonal and Presentational--as outlined in the ACTFL Performance Guidelines for K-12 Learners (1998) and the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century (National Standards for Foreign Language Education Project, 1999). The three tasks are aligned within a single theme or content area, reflecting the manner in which students naturally acquire and use the language in the real world or the classroom. Each task provides the information and elicits the linguistic interaction that is necessary for students to complete the subsequent task. IPAs are designed for students at the novice-, intermediate-, and pre-advanced levels of proficiency. They are standards-based; performance-based; developmental in nature; integrative; designed to be used with scoring rubrics that rate performance in terms of whether it meets expectations, exceeds expectations, or does not meet expectations for the task; and valid and reliable. The IPA section of the Virtual Assessment Center includes step-by-step guidelines for creating IPAs and over 30 examples of fully development IPAs.

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Upcoming Events
Jun
2021
24 - 25
Texas
Workshop
From design to success: Spanish Heritage Language teaching practices for engaging and empowering our students

This workshop will provide Spanish instructors with hands-on guidance for engaging heritage students based on their individual needs and local context. A variety of facilitators will share their expertise on integrating critical pedagogies, building writing skills, and engaging with the community. K-12 teachers, higher ed faculty, grad students can apply to present a poster at the poster session (deadline May 17, 2021) This workshop is intended for both K-12 and higher ed language instructors. CPE credits are available for those who attend the workshop in its entirety. Please notify us by June 22, 2021 of accessibility needs for the workshop, by emailing coerll@austin.utexas.edu. Sponsored by the Texas Coalition for Heritage Spanish (TeCHS), Center for Open Educational Resources and Language Learning (COERLL), and Texas Language Center (TLC).

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Jun - Jul
2021
29 - 2
Texas
Workshop
Games2Teach collaboratory

Presenter(s): Julie Sykes (CASLS, University of Oregon) Stephanie Knight (CASLS, University of Oregon) An interactive, online workshop where language teachers experience collaborative, game-oriented play, learn how game design principles promote language acquisition, and learn to implement games in their classrooms. Tuesday 6/29 and Friday 7/2 are synchronous, and Wednesday 6/30 and Thursday 7/1 involve supported, asynchronous prototype development. Based on the Games2Teach project from CASLS (University of Oregon) and CERCLL (University of Arizona). - Participants will be able to explain how game design principles promote language acquisition. - Participants will articulate at least one lesson in which learning opportunities are extended and enhanced with intentional use of game design principles. - Participants will demonstrate understanding of the connection between cognitive processes, play, and how play enhances learning. - Participants will demonstrate understanding of how play can promote interactional competence. This workshop is intended for both K-12 and higher ed language instructors. CPE credits are available for those who attend the workshop in its entirety. Cost: $50 for teachers & faculty, $25 for students Please notify us by June 22, 2021 of accessibility needs for the workshop, by emailing coerll@austin.utexas.edu.

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Jan
2022
27 - 30
Arizona
Conference
2022 Intercultural Competence Conference

ICC 2022: Decentering Mobility in Intercultural Education: Engagement, Equity and Access Extended Proposal Submission Deadline June 21, 2021 A hybrid event, in Tucson, Arizona, and online, with plenary speakers: * Uju Anya, Pennsylvania State University, USA * Maria Dasli, University of Edinburgh, Scotland * Jennifer Pipitone, College of Mount Saint Vincent, USA In January 2022, the eighth International Conference on the Development and Assessment of Intercultural Competence (ICC) will be a hybrid event on the theme of "Decentering Mobility in Intercultural Education: Engagement, Equity and Access." Presentations will focus on the ways in which intercultural communication and the teaching and learning thereof have been shaped through mobility – both virtual and physical. Of particular interest are contributions that address how the changing state of intercultural communication has been shaped by a world that is simultaneously more and less mobile, for example, due to differences in access among learners or to changing circumstances, such as the current global health crisis. Proposals will be submitted as one of five types: paper presentation, symposium, roundtable discussion, poster, and workshop. See the complete submission guidelines for more about the conference theme and the format of these presentations, proposal restrictions and limitations, access to the online proposal submission form, and notification dates, etc. Proposal Submission Deadline: June 4, 2021. Full Call for Proposals and Submission Guidelines: https://icc.arizona.edu/2022cfp/ Registration for ICC 2020 will open in the Fall.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

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