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Chokwe Brochure
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Chokwe is the Bantu language spoken by the Chokwe people of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Angola and Zambia. It is recognized as a national language of Angola, where about 456,000 people spoke it as of 1991. Another half a million speakers lived in the Congo in 1990, and some 44,200 in Zambia as of 1986. Angola’s Instituto de Línguas Nacionais (National Languages Institute) has established spelling rules for Chokwe with a view to facilitate and promote its use. It is used as a lingua franca in eastern Angola.

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Bassa Brochure
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Bassa is a Niger-Congo Kru language. Bassa language has its own unique alphabet. It has five different tones that are marked using a system of dots and dashes which appear inside vowel letters. There are several dialects including Gbor, Gba Sor, Mabahn, Hwen Gba Kon, Central Bassa, and Rivercess Bassa. Proverbs are a cornerstone to Bassa language. They are typically used by elders (mbong) in formal settings or family meetings.They are typically used when giving advice or solving a complex problem requiring pragmatic thinking. Proverbs also play a crucial role in educating the youth. There are proverbs for nearly every situation one can face in life.

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Berber Brochure
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Berber languages form a branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family comprising many closely related varieties, including Riff, Kabyle and Shilha, with a total of roughly 30 million-40 million speakers. Traditionally, men take care of livestock. They migrate by following the natural cycle of grazing, and seeking water and shelter. They are thus assured with an abundance of wool, cotton and plants used for dyeing. Women look after the family and handicrafts. The customs and traditions differ from one region to another

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
  • Research
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  • Assessment
  • Professional development
  • Less commonly taught languages initiatives
  • K-12 initiatives
  • Outreach and dissemination

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You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

Funding

The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
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