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Performed Culture Approach – Chinese: Communicating in the Culture, demo class 1
Web

Description

This demo Class One employs the "Performed Culture Approach" in teaching Chinese as a foreign language with the learning materials Chinese: Communicating in the Culture to the beginning level learners.

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The Formulation and Transition of China's Education Policy from 1978 to 2007: A Policy Discourse Analysis
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Description

"This is an important topic and one that is very timely given the nature of the research questions that have been explored. Anyone who wants to understand where Chinese education is headed should read this book. It is a must-read for those of us concerned with future impact of China's educational system not only on China but in the Asian Pacific region as well. The author does an excellent job of putting educational policy analysis into a Chinese historical and cultural context, as well as drawing some comparative perspectives with the Western legacy of higher education." ~ John N. Hawkins, Professor, Director, Center for International and Development Education, UCLA.

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Songs of Thorns and Flowers: Bilingual Performance and Discourse on Modern Korean Poetry series, Vol. 4, Sunlight In A Distant Place
Print

Description

This volume features 39 translated poems of the 2012 Ku Sang Poet Laureate Hong Yunsook. It is a pedagogical approach to modern Korean poetry for college-level Korean language and literature education outside Korea. To make visible the rhetorical and semantic transfer from Korean to English, the original and the translated poems are laid side by side. Historical explanations and requisite annotations on language use are provided where appropriate or needed. The included companion CD features video interviews with the Poet and audio recitation.

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Upcoming Events
Oct
2020
3
Arizona
Workshop
Webinar: Transformative Learning in a Social Justice Oriented Language Classroom

Webinar presented by Stacey Margarita Johnson (Vanderbilt University). Instructors building social justice into their language teaching often report that they hope their language classrooms will be sites of transformative learning and personal growth. As teachers, we want our teaching to make the world better and inspire students to become engaged citizens. Although we might hope for transformative learning, we don’t always know how it happens or how to guide our students through the process of transformation. This webinar will explore the steps in transformative learning, its connection to critical pedagogy and social justice, and, most importantly, ways language teachers can promote transformative learning through instructional choices that align with research and best practices in second language acquisition.

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Oct
2020
17
Arizona
Workshop
Webinar: Some Considerations for Social Justice Teaching in a World Language Setting: From Self to Students to World

Webinar presented by Michelle Nicola (Portland Public Schools). What do we mean when we say that we are social justice educators? What are concrete actions that social justice educators take? What beliefs or mindsets do we adopt? This webinar will help educators define what they mean by social justice education, and offer suggestions for how to incorporate self-reflection, relationship building & curriculum design as tools to recognize and interrupt inequitable patterns and practices in our world language classrooms and beyond. Participants will also receive a few lesson plan ideas that they can build on to meet their own communities’ social justice goals.

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Oct
2020
19 - 24
Arizona
Workshop
L2DL 2020: Critical Transnational Dialogue and Virtual Exchange

Accessible entirely online, the L2 Digital Literacies Symposium (L2DL) is a biennial international event offering an array of synchronous and asynchronous sessions that allow academics to make connections across the globe. In 2020, the conference focuses upon the theme of Critical Transnational Dialogue and Virtual Exchange, and explores intersections between international education, digital literacies, and virtual exchange. Virtual presentations selected from submitted proposals will be available during the week of October 19-24, and attendees are encouraged to participate in synchronous and asynchronous discussion that will take place through October 23; professional development credentials will be provided for presenters and attendees who participate in these activities. The symposium will culminate in livestreamed, invited presentations that will take place on October 23 and 24. The symposium schedule and presentation details are on the L2DL website. Access all the details and the link to registration there.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

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