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TIV Brochure
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Description

Tiv people trace their lineage back through one common predecessor named Tiv and his children that were believed to have originated from Southern Africa. Common ancestor of all the Tiv people, therefore, is a man named Tiv. He had two sons named Ichongo and Ipusu. And they formed the major clans among the Tiv people. These clans are based on patrilineage. The Tiv organized themselves into villages called Tar that were comprised of small groups of related clans (ipaven). Tiv were also known for their traditional system of exchanged marriage which was outlawed by the British in 1927. This system caused a lot of disputes which was part of the reason for its elimination by the British.

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Teso Brochure
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Teso is a Nilo-Saharan language spoken by the Teso, an ethnic group in eastern Uganda and western Kenya. Estimated to be about eight per cent of the Ugandan total population, the Teso people make one of the biggest tribes in the country. In every place or gathering that you attend, you are most likely to meet a Teso there.

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Susu Brochure
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Description

The Susu are believed to be descendents of the 13th century Mali Empire. They migrated to the Fouta Djallon, a lush mountainous region in Middle Guinea. It is believed that at this time, the Susu and the Yalunka were a homogenous ethnic group due to a high degree of similarity between the two languages. The two groups split apart when the Susu were driven out in 1725 by the Fulani in a Jihad. The Susu then migrated to the coastal regions of Guinea where they currently reside and the Yalunka relocated farther north towards present day Senegal.

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Upcoming Events
Sep
2021
29
Arizona
Workshop
Translating Google Translate: Instructional Strategies for Machine Translation in the Language Classroom

Webinar presented by Emily Hellmich (University of Arizona) and Kimberly Vinall (DeAnza College). Google Translate and other machine translation platforms can be a source of strife and confusion in language learning classrooms. Many instructors wonder if and how to handle these platforms with their students. This webinar presents a series of instructional strategies for how to approach machine translation platforms in the language classroom. These strategies come from findings of a research study that used screen recording and retrospective interviews to observe how foreign language learners (French, Spanish, Mandarin) actually use machine translation platforms while completing a writing task. In the webinar, we present key findings from the study and explore the implications they have for instructional practices. By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to: 1) broadly describe how students actually use machine translation; 2) identify a range of instructional strategies in three areas (training, assignment creation, policies); and 3) reflect on how to integrate take-ways from the webinar into their own teaching/learning contexts.

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Nov
2021
6
Arizona
Workshop
Building Bridges Across Cultures through Global Inquiry with Children

A webinar presented by Kathy G. Short and Dorea Kleker (University of Arizona). In our interconnected world, an understanding of global cultures has become a necessity as children are challenged to think and act globally. Our inquiry as educators is on creating instructional strategies that encourage children to develop open-minded perspectives toward ways of living that differ from their own. We invite children to engage in inquiries around specific cultures, while trying to avoid the pitfalls of only exploring surface aspects of a culture and not the deeper values and beliefs that underlie easily observable traditions and actions. Our goal is that children develop an orientation on the world that balances reflection on the known through identifying their loyalties with reflection on the new through developing open-minded perspectives. In this webinar, we share the instructional strategies and frameworks we have developed in working with elementary children to explore their cultural identities and to engage them in inquiries on specific global cultures, such as Korea and India. These inquiries are supported through global children’s literature and a range of interactive experiences. We will provide examples of children’s use of thinking routines, instructional strategies, and children’s books as well as engage participants in trying out several strategies.

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Jan
2022
27 - 30
Arizona
Conference
2022 Intercultural Competence Conference

ICC 2022: Decentering Mobility in Intercultural Education: Engagement, Equity and Access Extended Proposal Submission Deadline June 21, 2021 A hybrid event, in Tucson, Arizona, and online, with plenary speakers: * Uju Anya, Pennsylvania State University, USA * Maria Dasli, University of Edinburgh, Scotland * Jennifer Pipitone, College of Mount Saint Vincent, USA In January 2022, the eighth International Conference on the Development and Assessment of Intercultural Competence (ICC) will be a hybrid event on the theme of "Decentering Mobility in Intercultural Education: Engagement, Equity and Access." Presentations will focus on the ways in which intercultural communication and the teaching and learning thereof have been shaped through mobility – both virtual and physical. Of particular interest are contributions that address how the changing state of intercultural communication has been shaped by a world that is simultaneously more and less mobile, for example, due to differences in access among learners or to changing circumstances, such as the current global health crisis. Proposals will be submitted as one of five types: paper presentation, symposium, roundtable discussion, poster, and workshop. See the complete submission guidelines for more about the conference theme and the format of these presentations, proposal restrictions and limitations, access to the online proposal submission form, and notification dates, etc. Proposal Submission Deadline: June 4, 2021. Full Call for Proposals and Submission Guidelines: https://icc.arizona.edu/2022cfp/ Registration for ICC 2020 will open in the Fall.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

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