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Conducting a FACT Class
Audio-Visual

Description

Introduction to the "Performed Culture Approach" to the classroom instruction. This video shows how to conduct a FACT class to develop learners' explicit knowledge of language and culture. The example demonstrates an instructor's treatment of the particle "le" in Chinese in FACT class.

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Perform Suzhou: a Course in Intermediate to Advanced Spoken Mandarin
Print

Description

Perform Suzhou: a Course in Intermediate to Advanced Spoken Mandarin is a self-manageable intensive course designed to help Chinese language learners raise their level of sophistication in interacting with the local people while staying and studying in Suzhou. Communication strategies developed through this course will be generally applicable to other cities in China.

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Coyote Traces – Aku Wuwu’s Poetic Sojourn in America
Audio-Visual

Description

Aku Wuwu is a poet of the Yi ethnic minority in China, also a literary critic and a professor at Southwest University for Nationalities. "Coyote Traces – Aku Wuwu’s Poetic Sojourn in America" consists of 80 poems written in Chinese about Aku’s observations and insights during his travels among people of various races in America from Aku’s unique perspective as a cross-culture individual himself. This book also includes two valuable interviews of the author by one of the translators – Professor WEN Peihong. The other translator is Professor Mark Bender from DEALL at OSU. Here, we present the recitations of the poems in this book, as sound is always an important part of poetry. Reciters: Chinese – SUN Hong, professor and head of the Department of Performance (Drama, TV, and Film) in the School of Arts at Southwest University for Nationalities. English – Mark Bender, professor of Chinese literature and folklore at The Ohio State University.

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Upcoming Events
Apr
2021
16
Utah
Workshop
How to Improve 2nd Language Reading Fluency and Word Recognition (Chinese Language)

Reading fluently in a foreign or second language can be challenging. Past research has shown that reading fluency can influence word recognition and comprehension, but few action research projects have examined reading fluency. This session will report the results of a recently published study (Journal of Immersion and Content-Based Education) that investigated the effects of timed, repeated readings and peer assisted learning strategies (PALS) with Chinese Foreign Language (CFL) learners. Results showed that the PALS group scored significantly better on tests of reading fluency,character recognition, and comprehension than the control group. In addition, a survey that examined students’ attitudes towards literacy revealed that the PALS students reported significantly higher levels of confidence and enjoyment of reading. Session participants will learn how to develop and teach the PALS intervention and how to situate reading fluency within a comprehensive literacy program. This webinar is applicable for all Chinese teachers in different fields including DLI and general world language. THE WEBINAR IS FREE BUT REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED.

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Apr
2021
21
Arizona
Workshop
Webinar- Translation in the Multilingual Language Classroom: Rationale, Roles and Activity Design

A webinar presented by Sonia Colina and Sara Albrecht, University of Arizona. Pedagogical translation is making a comeback in the multilingual language classroom as an activity that promotes literacy, metalinguistic and cultural awareness, translanguaging, language diversity, and community engagement. While theoretical papers on this topic are becoming more common, practical guidance for teachers on how to incorporate translation in their curriculum in an informed manner is scarce. This presentation will help teachers understand the historical context that banned translation, the justification for its reintroduction, and the roles translation can serve in language learning. Participants will be guided through sample activities and will learn basic steps to design translation activities that meet their learning goals. This webinar is part of a larger CERCLL project, Cross-Cultural Thinking Through Translation and Interpretation

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May
2021
8
Arizona
Workshop
Webinar- Vlogging Abroad: L2 Multimodal Composing for Language Learning and Cultural Reflection

Webinar presented by Natalie Amgott, a doctoral candidate in Second Language Acquisition and Teaching at the University of Arizona. In the twenty-first century, the growing importance of multicultural and multilingual competences is undeniable in our global economy (Douglas Fir Group, 2016). While decades of educators have called for channeling the “multi” into our modes, genres, and registers of language teaching materials (e.g., the New London Group, 1996), little research exists on how multimodal composing can mediate expansion of linguistic and cultural repertoire in L2 contexts outside of EFL and ESL (Kumagai et al., 2015; Schmerbeck & Lucht, 2017). In this webinar, postsecondary instructors and administrators of world languages will learn how to leverage multimodal composing for language learning and cultural reflection in study abroad contexts. A brief overview of how multimodal composing has been applied to EFL and ESL contexts will highlight how multimodal projects support academic learning (Pacheco et al., 2017), self-reflection (DeJaynes, 2015), and multilingual identities (Cummins et al., 2015). Amgott will then illustrate how the findings in EFL and literacy research can be translated to the postsecondary study abroad arena. Attendees will learn about the importance of modeling and scaffolding for fostering engagement and access to full multilingual and multimodal repertoires through multimodal composing (Pacheco & Smith, 2015; Smith et al., 2017) and discuss how multimodal and technological workshops can be coupled with discussion of the vlog genre in order for students to reflexively explore their study abroad environment. After this session, attendees will be able to apply their understanding of multimodality and their course context(s) to encourage students to use multimodal vlogging to reflect on cultural and socioemotional experiences, to develop metalinguistic awareness, and to promote goal-setting and accountability in the language learning community. This event is one in a two-part webinar series on exploring Intercultural communication in the L2 classroom.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

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Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
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