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Voice and Vision in Language Teacher Education: Selected Papers from the Fourth International Conference on Language Teacher Education
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This volume of fourteen selected papers presented at the Fourth International Conference on Language Teacher Education showcases work from eight different national contexts in settings as diverse as English as a Foreign Language (EFL), English as a Second Language (ESL), French immersion education, and Spanish and Japanese language instruction. Echoing the theme of the conference, these papers highlight a diverse range of teacher educator voices as they interact with the vision of conceptual frameworks teacher educators have come to share.The ideas and insights presented in these papers help to push forward our understandings and our practice of language teacher education.

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UG access in L2 acquisition: Reassessing the question Colloquium papers from the Second Language Research Forum 1998 October 15–18, 1998 at the University of Hawai‘i
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Original Invitation to the Colloquium: At a special colloquium at SLRF/Los Angeles in 1989, participants examined the so-called access question: Is Universal Grammar accessible to the (adult) L2 learner? Given that nearly ten years have passed since that colloquium, and given that we have, in that time, learned a good deal more about the nature of the human language faculty, it seems like a good time to reexamine the assumptions that went into the original UG-access research of the 1980s. In particular, then, questions that participants at the present colloquium might consider include (at least) the following: Is the original access question a reasonable one to ask at the present time? Does the current state of linguistic theory, our current understanding of the human language potential, warrant the original question? If not, how should the question be reformulated? How would such a reformulation affect our understanding of previous research, as well as any future attempts at falsification of a reformulated question? After the colloquium, several members of the audience asked whether we had taped or videotaped the session. In fact, the idea had never dawned on any of us. In the days after the conference, we then discussed the feasibility of making the papers available as unpublished manuscripts on the web. Of course, because the manuscripts do not include the Q&A discussions that followed each and every presentation, making the papers web-accessible will not substitute entirely. Nevertheless, we hope that the papers will at least stimulate further discussion of the issues. Indeed, if you have questions of your own, you are certainly welcome to e-mail any of us.

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Teaching Russian reading in a distance classroom: A report
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In the spring of 1997, the author team-taught a Russian Reading course at the University of Hawai'i via a distance classroom. A brief report about the course is found at this site.

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Mar
2021
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Call for Papers
CALL FOR PAPERS: 7th International Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation (ICLDC): Recognizing Relationships

ICLDC 2021: GENERAL SESSION PROPOSALS (PAPERS & POSTERS – DEADLINE: SEPTEMBER 30, 2020) While we especially welcome abstracts that address the conference theme, we also welcome abstracts on other subjects in language documentation and conservation, which may include but are not limited to: - Archiving and mobilizing language materials - Ethical issues - Indigenous language education - Indigenous sign languages - Language and its relation to health and well being - Language planning - Language reclamation and revitalization - Language work in the era of covid-19 - Lexicography, grammar, orthography and corpus design - Multidisciplinary language documentation - Successful models of documentation - Technology in documentation and reclamation - Topics in areal language documentation - Training and capacity building in language work - Other PRESENTATION FORMATS Papers: To allow for as many presentations as possible, we have decided that all 20-minute paper presentations will be pre-recorded and uploaded to a platform (to be announced) a few weeks before the beginning of the conference. Conference participants will then have an opportunity to watch presentations before the beginning of the conference. During the conference itself, each paper presentation will be given scheduled time for questions and discussion synchronously over Zoom (details of the discussion period will be announced in October 2020). We are also exploring different ways of encouraging interaction asynchronously (e.g., by posting comments and questions) or synchronously throughout the conference. Posters: To allow for as many poster presentations as possible, posters will be uploaded as a PDF a few weeks prior to the beginning of the conference. Poster presenters will have the option of uploading an accompanying 10 minute audio/video recording walking participants through the poster. Poster presenters will also have the opportunity to interact with participants at a scheduled time during the conference. All paper and poster presentations will be archived in ScholarSpace, the University of Hawaii Repository, for continued viewing after the end of the ICLDC. For more details or to submit a proposal, visit http://ling.lll.hawaii.edu/sites/icldc/call-for-proposals/papers-posters/

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Mar
2021
4 - 7
Hawaii
Conference
7th International Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation (ICLDC): Recognizing Relationships

RECOGNIZING RELATIONSHIPS The 7th International Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation (ICLDC) University of Hawaii at Manoa March 4-7, 2021 COVID-19 STATEMENT Due to COVID-19, ICLDC 2021 will be held virtually. The ICLDC 7 organizers are excited about this year’s theme, and the possibilities for broad international discussion that an online conference can offer. We are currently investigating what technologies we will use and how the conference will take shape and how we can accommodate time zone differences for presenters, as well as family and work obligations. We look forward to your participation. Please “join” us! CONFERENCE THEME: RECOGNIZING RELATIONSHIPS There are many critical challenges that endangered language documentation and conservation faces, some of which seem insurmountable, and despite linguists’ best efforts, many of the proposed solutions fall short. These challenges have been apparent to many communities, language activists and academic linguists since (or even before) the earliest public warnings of the “endangered language crisis” in the early 1990’s, and recognition of the great number of large-scale challenges has only become more apparent since. One reason that many of the current solutions have not reached the level of success to which they have aspired is that the need to identify and/or foster relationships is often minimized or even ignored completely. Identifying and fostering relationships by taking the time to build understanding between stakeholders, learning about needs and skills that can be offered, and developing shared goals and outcomes are central to sustainable solutions for language documentation and conservation. These relationships go beyond those between communities and linguists and extend to multi-party relationships among linguists, communities, other academic fields, governmental and non-governmental organizations, educational and funding agencies, and many other individuals invested in the future of the language. There are also important intra-group relationships within these stakeholding groups (e.g., between members of an Indigenous community, or language workers documenting signed languages and those documenting spoken languages) as well as inter-group relationships between different Indigenous communities. At ICLDC 2021 we propose to initiate a dialogue on how recognizing relationships can help overcome the many critical challenges in language documentation and language reclamation. We believe that this focus will lead to improved connections among academic linguists, various communities, researchers from other disciplines, educational practitioners, and many other stakeholders. We specifically aim to draw attention to the transformative power of recognizing relationships to overcome critical challenges. For more information, visit our conference website: http://ling.lll.hawaii.edu/sites/icldc/

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