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Umbundu Brohcure
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The Umbundu language was formed from different groups of people who slowly moved from the North and formed the local/regional groups there today, and have formed political units. They have developed a sophisticated agriculture, which includes the breeding of small animals and cows. In the 16th century they took advantage of the Portuguese communities being established and formed trading routes/ agreements. With each of the routes (caravans), each group became even more independent than they had been. They appointed professional leaders and diviners. The trade thrived on slavery. When slavery decreased around 1904, so did the trade, and finally ended in 1910. This also had somewhat to do with the way trade was conducted. Since the major railway was also built in 1904, the caravans began to die out which meant that the leaders and diviners were not needed anymore.

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Tumbuka Brochure
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The Tumbuka are an ethnic group living in Malawi, Zambia and Tanzania. In the Tumbuka mythology, Chiuta is the chief deity; he is all-powerful, omniscient and self-created. Chiuta literally means Great Bow and is symbolised in the sky by the rainbow. He is also a god of rain and fertility. Tumbuka, like most African languages, has many myths that constitute its cultural heritage.These myths, told around fires at night, often to the accompaniment of drumming and choral responses, aim to teach children moral behavior and to entertain. these vidokoni (fictitious stories) have a moral behind them.

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Serer-Sine
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The Serer are famous throughout Senegal and Gambia for their clothing. Serr is a traditional clothing woven by men. Serr is believed to bring good luck to those who wear it. The Serer people are also famous for a form of wrestling that is popular throughout the region called Laamb or Njomb. Serer religion is centered on universal supreme deity called Rog. There are also lesser gods, goddesses and spirits. The Serers strongly believe in the importance of the ancestral spirits (pangool) and reincarnation.

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Upcoming Events
Nov
2021
6
Arizona
Workshop
Building Bridges Across Cultures through Global Inquiry with Children

A webinar presented by Kathy G. Short and Dorea Kleker (University of Arizona). In our interconnected world, an understanding of global cultures has become a necessity as children are challenged to think and act globally. Our inquiry as educators is on creating instructional strategies that encourage children to develop open-minded perspectives toward ways of living that differ from their own. We invite children to engage in inquiries around specific cultures, while trying to avoid the pitfalls of only exploring surface aspects of a culture and not the deeper values and beliefs that underlie easily observable traditions and actions. Our goal is that children develop an orientation on the world that balances reflection on the known through identifying their loyalties with reflection on the new through developing open-minded perspectives. In this webinar, we share the instructional strategies and frameworks we have developed in working with elementary children to explore their cultural identities and to engage them in inquiries on specific global cultures, such as Korea and India. These inquiries are supported through global children’s literature and a range of interactive experiences. We will provide examples of children’s use of thinking routines, instructional strategies, and children’s books as well as engage participants in trying out several strategies.

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Jan
2022
27 - 30
Arizona
Conference
2022 Intercultural Competence Conference

ICC 2022: Decentering Mobility in Intercultural Education: Engagement, Equity and Access Extended Proposal Submission Deadline June 21, 2021 A hybrid event, in Tucson, Arizona, and online, with plenary speakers: * Uju Anya, Pennsylvania State University, USA * Maria Dasli, University of Edinburgh, Scotland * Jennifer Pipitone, College of Mount Saint Vincent, USA In January 2022, the eighth International Conference on the Development and Assessment of Intercultural Competence (ICC) will be a hybrid event on the theme of "Decentering Mobility in Intercultural Education: Engagement, Equity and Access." Presentations will focus on the ways in which intercultural communication and the teaching and learning thereof have been shaped through mobility – both virtual and physical. Of particular interest are contributions that address how the changing state of intercultural communication has been shaped by a world that is simultaneously more and less mobile, for example, due to differences in access among learners or to changing circumstances, such as the current global health crisis. Proposals will be submitted as one of five types: paper presentation, symposium, roundtable discussion, poster, and workshop. See the complete submission guidelines for more about the conference theme and the format of these presentations, proposal restrictions and limitations, access to the online proposal submission form, and notification dates, etc. Proposal Submission Deadline: June 4, 2021. Full Call for Proposals and Submission Guidelines: https://icc.arizona.edu/2022cfp/ Registration for ICC 2020 will open in the Fall.

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