Title Format Sponsor
At Home in Japan
Web

Description

Our goal in this tutorial is to present a program of practical learning that will allow you to go through the process of becoming familiar with Japanese culture, even before you get there. The crucial aspect of "becoming familiar" with a culture is that the experience centers on you. Through a process of trial and error you must learn the appropriate things to say and do. But you must also survive the learning process. There is no way to steer you clear of all potential mistakes, but this tutorial can at least help you identify and learn from them. The learning process in this tutorial replicates the trial-and-error process of "being there". The tutorial maps a critical minefield in the learning process, the things that no one thinks to tell a newcomer. These are not mentioned, precisely because it is assumed that everyone must already know them. Yet ironically, these are the very things one most needs to know in order to successfully adjust, and they may not be obvious to the newcomer at all. While this minefield exists for all cultures, in Japan it is compounded by cultural expectations of not speaking directly; because others are expected to intuit what one is not saying. It goes without saying that this is difficult for newcomers to manage.

Resource Link
Orient Yourself: Online Catalog of Study Abroad Opportunities in East Asia
Web

Description

For American students to access information about East Asian institutes and American institutes that offer study abroad programs in East Asia, as well as scholarships and financial aids for study abroad. Select from the links to the left to begin your journey to Asia.

Resource Link
Chinese Computerized Adaptive Listening Comprehension Test (CCALT)
Web

Description

CCALT measures the student's listening comprehension of Mandarin Chinese and assigns a proficiency level upon the student's completion of the test. The proficiency testing follows the guidelines by the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages. It uses sound algorithms to adapt the difficulty level of the items to the individual student, collecting data along the way for item selection and rating of proficiency.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
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  • Outreach and dissemination

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You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

Funding

The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
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