Title Format Sponsor
Pathways V. 07 Advances in Japanese Pedagogy
Print

Description

Details: Essays designed to support informed classroom and curricular decisions. Dispels some of the misunderstandings about Japanese language instruction and introduces the intellectual inquires we are making in the field. Contents: Ch.1 Development of Kanji Knowledge Among Adult JFL Learners. Ch.2 Subvocalization in Reading Kanji: Can Japanese Text Be Comprehended Without It? Ch.3 Developmental Sequences. Ch.4 Japanese Second Language Acquisition in the Classroom. Ch.5 Reading as Socio-Cultural Performance. Ch.6 Can a Computer Tutor Detect Problems with Linked Sentences? Ch.7 The Logic of Japanese Language Practice. Ch.8 Automaticity and Its Implications for JFL Pedagogy. Ch.9 Japanese for Special Purposes: Teaching Japanese to Engineers and Scientists. Ch.10 Pedagogic Implications of Standards-based Education. Ch.11 The First Framework: Getting Down to Basics.

Resource Link
Pathways V. 04 Learner, Text and Context: An Arabic Perspective
Print

Description

Contents: CH. 1 Language Learning Strategies of Successful Learners CH. 2 Reading Strategies of Elementary and Advanced Learners: Effects of CALL Coding Options on Comprehension CH. 3 Impact of the Linguistic Situation in the Target Culture on Teaching the Language Abroad: The Case of Arabic Diglossia CH. 4 The Construct of the Educated Native Speaker of Arabic: Implications for Curriculum Design CH. 5 Computer-Assisted Language Learning: Linkage Between Learning and Research CH. 6 Models of Foreign Language Acquisition and the Meaning-Form Relationship CH. 7 Curriculum Design: Theoretical Bases and Implications CH. 8 Assessment of Functional Language Abilities Appendix A: A Typology of Learning Strategies Appendix B: Foreign Language Learning Strategies Appendix C: Guidelines for Writing the Language Learning Journal Appendix D: Selected Questions Asked in the Oral Interviews Appendix E: A List of Colloquial Lexical Items in the Speech of Native Speakers in a Formal Situation Appendix F: Transliteration Key

Resource Link
Pathways V. 03 NFLC Guide for Basic Chinese Language Programs (2nd Edition)
Print

Description

The guide tends to assist in the creation of new Chinese language programs. It incorporates a set of informed and explicit assumptions about learning and teaching the language that underlie the creation of a syllabus and the pedagogical practices involved in implementing it. The target readership includes Chinese language teachers and program administrators.

Resource Link
3 of 673
Show all
Show free resources only
Show less
Show more
Upcoming Events
Mar
2019
20
Arizona
Presentation
University of Arizona Language Fair

This March, the Center for Educational Resources in Culture, Language and Literacy will launch the UA Language Fair, an event designed to raise the visibility of the wide range of languages that students study at The University of Arizona. The event is open to all students, faculty/staff, and visitors to campus. Departments, programs, and UA student clubs representing the languages and cultures taught at UA can register for table space (3-6 feet of space per registration) at which they will showcase the languages taught in their departments and spoken in their communities. CERCLL is also sponsoring small grants (up to $150) to support the purchase of materials for activities or small treats for distribution at these tables. Registration for this event–and the application for funding–will be open on February 15. The deadline to register and apply for funding is March 8, 2019. During the registration process, respondents will be asked to provide the following information: name, department and contact information for the person submitting the application; department / program / organization represented; amount of table space requested (tables are 6 feet in length; registrants can request a half or a whole table, or in the case of a department representing more than one language, they can request multiple tables); business manager name and contact information; a description of the table(s) that will be displayed (maximum 300 words), including language(s) and world regions to be represented, and activities planned; and an itemized budget for any application for funding. Questions? Contact CERCLL at cercll@email.arizona.edu, or (520) 626-8071.

Event Link
Apr
2019
6
Arizona
Workshop
LaTeS Workshop: Strengthening your Core: Practices to Support Students’ Language Development

Language Teacher Symposium (LaTeS) Spring 2019 Strengthening your Core: Practices to Support Students’ Language Development Presented by Kristin Davin (University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Department of Middle, Secondary and K12 Education) The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) designated six core practices that are critical for effective language teaching because they support students’ language development and occur frequently in instruction across contexts. These practices include: Facilitating target language comprehensibility, Guiding learners through interpreting authentic resources, Designing oral interpersonal communication tasks, Planning with backward design model, Teaching grammar as a concept and use in context, and Providing appropriate oral feedback. In this workshop, participants will explore these six core practices and the research base of each one. They will dive deeply into two of these practices, Guiding learners through interpreting authentic resources and Designing oral interpersonal communication tasks. Participants will engage in activities that foster their understanding of how to choose appropriate authentic texts and ways to check students’ understanding of those texts. They will also develop and share oral interpersonal communication tasks that foster spontaneous communication and negotiation of meaning. Participants will leave this workshop with a variety of interpretive and interpersonal communication tasks that they can immediately carry out in their classrooms. A certificate for 6 hours of Arizona Continuing Education will be provided to attendees. Saturday April 6, 2019, 9.a.m. to 4 p.m. Location: University of Arizona campus The event is free to attend (including lunch), but registration is required.

Event Link
Apr
2019
13
Georgia
Workshop
Weapons of Mass Instruction: Making the Most of Planning, Routines, and Structure

Participants will be charged to reflect on the structure, routines, and high-leverage habits that make their class a memorable experience for students rather than just memorized content. In the context of large, diverse classes, the presenter will share the ACTFL Six Core Practice hacks that make can-do and proficiency-based language teaching enjoyable and effective. Participants will receive all files used and then, in turn, create their own versions to fit their own beginning 2019-20 units to start the school year refreshed and excited.

Event Link
0 - 3 of 12
All LRCs
Previous LRC
Next LRC
In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
  • Research
  • Teaching materials
  • Digital tools and resources
  • Assessment
  • Professional development
  • Less commonly taught languages initiatives
  • K-12 initiatives
  • Outreach and dissemination

Contact Us

You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

Funding

The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
© Title VI Language Resource Centers