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Curriculum Template, Hindi for Hindi Speakers
Web

Description

In this five week program high school students of South Asian heritage will improve their comprehension, oral proficiency, and gain literacy skills in Hindi. Students will learn the Hindi alphabet, read and write simple texts in Hindi, increase their vocabulary in target language. Class materials will be authentic content that is meaningful to them, age appropriate, and intellectually engaging.

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Curriculum Template, Armenian for Armenian Speakers
Web

Description

In this five week program high school students of Armenian heritage will improve their comprehension, oral proficiency, and gain literacy skills in Eastern Armenian. Students will learn the Armenian alphabet, read and write simple texts in Armenian, increase their vocabulary in the target language. Class materials will be authentic content that is meaningful to them, age appropriate, and intellectually engaging. Content is thematically designed to increase students’ knowledge about Armenian culture and society.

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Curriculum Guidelines For Heritage Language Classrooms at the University of California
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Description

On February 14-15, 2003 the Heritage Language Focus Group convened at UCLA to design a set of curriculum guidelines for heritage language instruction at the University of California pursuant to an NEH Humanities Focus Grant. This project supplements the UC Guidelines on Heritage Language Instruction (Guidelines: 2002) which, in anticipation of the Focus grant, did not address curriculum issues. The following is a report of the Focus Group's consensus on the principles to be applied in developing curricula for heritage language education. The Introduction offers a general description of heritage speakers. Following the introduction, the report focuses on three areas crucial to curriculum design: assessment (I), instructional materials (II), and teacher training (III). Attached as an appendix to this report is a table that presents issues to be taken into account when creating curricula for heritage language students.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
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  • Outreach and dissemination

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The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
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