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Japanese language needs analysis 1998-1999
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This report presents the results of the first stage of an on-going curriculum development project aimed at creating performance based tests for the first and second year Japanese language courses at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa. That first stage is a needs analysis of the learning needs of first and second year Japanese language students as perceived by the students and their teachers. This introductory section will lay the groundwork by discussing a number of relevant issues including the following: (a) the community background (including the vitality of the Japanese in Hawai`i), (b) the Japanese Language Program and the students at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa, and (c) a literature review on needs analysis (including subsections on needs analysis in general education, needs analysis in ESL curriculum development, and needs analysis in Japanese curriculum development).

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Japanese placement tests at the University of Hawai‘i: Applying item response theory
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First-rate placement procedures are important for effective teaching and learning in any language program because they help create classes that are relatively homogeneous in terms of the language proficiency of the students. The main purpose of this study was to investigate how effectively and efficiently the current norm-referenced Japanese Placement Test (JPT) battery for the Japanese language program (three multiple-choice tests and essay test) at UHM separates the incoming students of Japanese into different course levels. The XCalibretm computer software program (Assessment Systems, 1997) was used to estimate the discrimination, difficulty, and guessing parameters for each item on each multiple-choice test. Based on these IRT analyses, we were able to suggest that all three multiple-choice tests be reduced in length while maintaining the same, if not better, level of reliability. Additional analyses of the interrater reliability of the essay tests using the Spearman-Brown prophecy formula led us to suggest that the essay test might be made more efficient by using two raters instead of three. The pattern of correlation coefficients between the tests indicates a certain degree of convergent validity for all the tests in this study, especially the subscales within the essay test. At the same time, when factor analysis was applied, support for divergent validity was also found based on language skills and testing method.

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Keys to Chinese character writing (text + video)
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Keys to Chinese Character Writing is a self-paced tutorial text plus video designed to address common problems students face when learning to write Chinese characters. Its systematic instruction in Chinese characters covers the principles of character structure, the basic strokes, and proper stroke order. The most frequently used radicals are thoroughly covered, providing solid grounding for dictionary work.

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Upcoming Events
Mar
2019
20
Arizona
Presentation
University of Arizona Language Fair

This March, the Center for Educational Resources in Culture, Language and Literacy will launch the UA Language Fair, an event designed to raise the visibility of the wide range of languages that students study at The University of Arizona. The event is open to all students, faculty/staff, and visitors to campus. Departments, programs, and UA student clubs representing the languages and cultures taught at UA can register for table space (3-6 feet of space per registration) at which they will showcase the languages taught in their departments and spoken in their communities. CERCLL is also sponsoring small grants (up to $150) to support the purchase of materials for activities or small treats for distribution at these tables. Registration for this event–and the application for funding–will be open on February 15. The deadline to register and apply for funding is March 8, 2019. During the registration process, respondents will be asked to provide the following information: name, department and contact information for the person submitting the application; department / program / organization represented; amount of table space requested (tables are 6 feet in length; registrants can request a half or a whole table, or in the case of a department representing more than one language, they can request multiple tables); business manager name and contact information; a description of the table(s) that will be displayed (maximum 300 words), including language(s) and world regions to be represented, and activities planned; and an itemized budget for any application for funding. Questions? Contact CERCLL at cercll@email.arizona.edu, or (520) 626-8071.

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Apr
2019
6
Arizona
Workshop
LaTeS Workshop: Strengthening your Core: Practices to Support Students’ Language Development

Language Teacher Symposium (LaTeS) Spring 2019 Strengthening your Core: Practices to Support Students’ Language Development Presented by Kristin Davin (University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Department of Middle, Secondary and K12 Education) The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) designated six core practices that are critical for effective language teaching because they support students’ language development and occur frequently in instruction across contexts. These practices include: Facilitating target language comprehensibility, Guiding learners through interpreting authentic resources, Designing oral interpersonal communication tasks, Planning with backward design model, Teaching grammar as a concept and use in context, and Providing appropriate oral feedback. In this workshop, participants will explore these six core practices and the research base of each one. They will dive deeply into two of these practices, Guiding learners through interpreting authentic resources and Designing oral interpersonal communication tasks. Participants will engage in activities that foster their understanding of how to choose appropriate authentic texts and ways to check students’ understanding of those texts. They will also develop and share oral interpersonal communication tasks that foster spontaneous communication and negotiation of meaning. Participants will leave this workshop with a variety of interpretive and interpersonal communication tasks that they can immediately carry out in their classrooms. A certificate for 6 hours of Arizona Continuing Education will be provided to attendees. Saturday April 6, 2019, 9.a.m. to 4 p.m. Location: University of Arizona campus The event is free to attend (including lunch), but registration is required.

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Jun
2019
10 - 11
Texas
Workshop
Spanish Heritage Language Workshop

This is a workshop for Spanish teachers of heritage speaking high school and university level students. We will post more information about this workshop as we continue to organize it. Sign up for COERLL's newsletter to receive updates: https://goo.gl/5zPVze.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

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