Title Format Sponsor
Ideal Classmates & Reciprocal Idealizing
Audio-Visual

Description

Tim Murphey describes an easy action research/activity done in the spring of 2012 with 488 students in four Tokyo area Japanese universities. It had a big impact on the students and could easily be replicated in other classrooms, in almost any school situation. Murphey’s Tokyo research group asked students the following question: #39 Please describe a group of classmates that you could learn English well with. What would you all do to help each other learn better and more enjoyably? いっしょに親しく英語を学ぶクラスメートのグループがどのようなものかを想像して書いてみて下さい。より上手に楽しく助け合って学ぶにはどうすればいいでしょうか。 Their answers were so interesting that the researchers first compiled them anonymously on a handout and gave them back to each class for discussion. Then the 488 comments were coded into 16 descriptors and looped back to the same students a month later to ask if these indeed were important, if their classmates were doing them, and if they were doing them. The positive results can be understood partially through the field of Appreciative Inquiry, emotional contagion (Hatfield, et al., 1994), the altruistic turn, dynamic systems theory, and critical participatory looping. Teachers will be given practical ideas for doing these and similar things in the classroom. In the meantime, Tim dares to ask you (and dares you to ask others!) “What do people do to help you have a great day and a meaningful life?”

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Noticing and second language acquisition: Studies in honor of Richard Schmidt
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Description

This volume celebrates the life and groundbreaking work of Richard Schmidt, the developer of the influential Noticing Hypothesis in the field of second language acquisition. The 19 chapters encompass a compelling collection of cutting­edge research studies exploring such constructs as noticing, attention, and awareness from multiple perspectives, which expand, fine tune, sometimes support, and sometimes challenge Schmidt’s seminal ideas and take research on noticing in exciting new directions.

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Chinese Language Association of Secondary-elementary Schools (CLASS)
Web

Description

The CLASS website is an educational site dedicated to providing information on Chinese language and culture. CLASS offers a platform for K-12 teachers to communicate with each other, exchange ideas, and network with members for the purpose of encouraging more students to learn Chinese.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

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