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At Home in Japan
Web

Description

Our goal in this tutorial is to present a program of practical learning that will allow you to go through the process of becoming familiar with Japanese culture, even before you get there. The crucial aspect of "becoming familiar" with a culture is that the experience centers on you. Through a process of trial and error you must learn the appropriate things to say and do. But you must also survive the learning process. There is no way to steer you clear of all potential mistakes, but this tutorial can at least help you identify and learn from them. The learning process in this tutorial replicates the trial-and-error process of "being there". The tutorial maps a critical minefield in the learning process, the things that no one thinks to tell a newcomer. These are not mentioned, precisely because it is assumed that everyone must already know them. Yet ironically, these are the very things one most needs to know in order to successfully adjust, and they may not be obvious to the newcomer at all. While this minefield exists for all cultures, in Japan it is compounded by cultural expectations of not speaking directly; because others are expected to intuit what one is not saying. It goes without saying that this is difficult for newcomers to manage.

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Chinese Computerized Adaptive Listening Comprehension Test (CCALT)
Web

Description

CCALT measures the student's listening comprehension of Mandarin Chinese and assigns a proficiency level upon the student's completion of the test. The proficiency testing follows the guidelines by the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages. It uses sound algorithms to adapt the difficulty level of the items to the individual student, collecting data along the way for item selection and rating of proficiency.

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Pathway to Korean: Beginning Spoken Korean from Zero
Web

Description

This online publication was produced with support from the Title VI Grant of U.S. Department of Education. This project is to produce first-level materials for students with no previous exposure to the Korean language. Materials developed thus far include five units and more than forty lessons/stages. In the self-study format, these materials are composed of a “head-start” package, a print, audio program and video program. They introduce the true beginners to the Korean sound system, instructional expressions, performances of basic personal interactions, and Hangul, the Korean alphabet. QuickTime multimedia player is needed to browse these pages.

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Upcoming Events
Oct
2018
14 - 19
Arizona
Symposium
L2DL - Participation, Equity and Inclusion: L2 Digital Literacies (L2DL) Symposium

Participation, a long-standing assessment category on language syllabi, has found a new conceptual life over the last few decades as digital literacies practices have become a part of everyday life and learning. This symposium aims to contribute to discussions of the role of digital literacies in second language learning and teaching and biliteracy development, by considering the ways in which technologically-mediated communication can enable new forms of participation and access, but also the ways in which participation in digital spaces is rarely full and equitable, but is more often than not fraught with questions of legitimacy and symbolic power. This is the third event in a biennial series that examines various roles of digital literacies in language learning; presentations and resources from the 2014 and 2016 symposia can be found on the website and CERCLL's YouTube channel.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
  • Research
  • Teaching materials
  • Digital tools and resources
  • Assessment
  • Professional development
  • Less commonly taught languages initiatives
  • K-12 initiatives
  • Outreach and dissemination

Contact Us

You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

Funding

The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
© Title VI Language Resource Centers