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Teso Brochure
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Description

Teso is a Nilo-Saharan language spoken by the Teso, an ethnic group in eastern Uganda and western Kenya. Estimated to be about eight per cent of the Ugandan total population, the Teso people make one of the biggest tribes in the country. In every place or gathering that you attend, you are most likely to meet a Teso there.

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TIV Brochure
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Tiv people trace their lineage back through one common predecessor named Tiv and his children that were believed to have originated from Southern Africa. Common ancestor of all the Tiv people, therefore, is a man named Tiv. He had two sons named Ichongo and Ipusu. And they formed the major clans among the Tiv people. These clans are based on patrilineage. The Tiv organized themselves into villages called Tar that were comprised of small groups of related clans (ipaven). Tiv were also known for their traditional system of exchanged marriage which was outlawed by the British in 1927. This system caused a lot of disputes which was part of the reason for its elimination by the British.

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Tonga Brochure
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The Tonga people of Zambia and Zimbabwe (also called ‘Batonga’) are a Bantu ethnic group of southern Zambia and the neighbouring northern Zimbabwe, and to a lesser extent, in Mozambique. They are related to the Batoka who are part of the Tokaleya people in the same area, and also to the Tonga people of Malawi. In southern Zambia they are patrons of the Kafue Twa. The BaTonga people of Zimbabwe are found in and around the Binga District, Binga village the Kariba area, and parts of Matabeleland. They number up to 300,000 and are mostly subsistence farmers. ln Zimbabwe the language of Tonga people is called chitonga. During construction of the Kariba Dam in the 1950s the Tonga community was displaced cutting cultural ties with the other Tonga communities in Zambia.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
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  • Outreach and dissemination

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You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

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The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
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