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Enhancing Academic Language Proficiency in a Fifth-Grade Spanish Immersion Classroom
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This technical report outlined the results of a study aimed to promote the development of more complex academic language and linguistic structures by giving immersion students the opportunity to enhance their inner voice in that language. Since the development of L2 inner voice in elementary immersion students has not been investigated to any extent, this study set out to determine how the enhancement of the students' L2 inner voice in the immersion classroom might influence linguistic knowledge and the ability to comprehend and produce language. It was posited that it might be possible to stimulate increased use of the immersion language by students while also enhancing the academic vocabulary and grammatical structure of the language that they use for specific tasks. More specifically, the pedagogical intervention included: (1) modeling by the teacher and the research assistant (RA) in the use of Spanish academic language to solve problems in science and history, and (2) supporting the students in developing their own L2 inner voice in Spanish through modeling and follow up activities.

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Culture as the Core
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Two collections of CARLA conference papers on the very important issue of integrating culture into the second language classroom were merged into one volume that was published by Information Age Publishing

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Developing Classroom Materials for Less Commonly Taught Languages
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This book provides both principles and practical guidelines for LCTL teachers of all levels and languages to transform raw materials into activities for the language classroom. Grounded in research, the author lays out a series of principles that serve to remind teachers of the possibilities that exist when they consider using authentic materials in the classroom. Each principle in the book is accompanied by numerous practical examples in a wide variety of languages created by the author and by teachers who have participated in a summer institute led by Bill Johnston and Louis Janus at CARLA since 1999.

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Upcoming Events
Oct
2018
14 - 19
Arizona
Symposium
L2DL - Participation, Equity and Inclusion: L2 Digital Literacies (L2DL) Symposium

Participation, a long-standing assessment category on language syllabi, has found a new conceptual life over the last few decades as digital literacies practices have become a part of everyday life and learning. This symposium aims to contribute to discussions of the role of digital literacies in second language learning and teaching and biliteracy development, by considering the ways in which technologically-mediated communication can enable new forms of participation and access, but also the ways in which participation in digital spaces is rarely full and equitable, but is more often than not fraught with questions of legitimacy and symbolic power. This is the third event in a biennial series that examines various roles of digital literacies in language learning; presentations and resources from the 2014 and 2016 symposia can be found on the website and CERCLL's YouTube channel.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
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  • Digital tools and resources
  • Assessment
  • Professional development
  • Less commonly taught languages initiatives
  • K-12 initiatives
  • Outreach and dissemination

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You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

Funding

The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
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