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Online Cafés: Creating language & culture learning communities
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Description

The virtual equivalent of the neighborhood coffee house, the online café is a place for people to gather for conversation and social interaction. In the Online Cafés project, language educators have worked together to design online cafés in which language learners in different locations can engage in intercultural exchange and language practice. Explore this site to find out more about online cafés for intercultural exchange.

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High-Leverage Teaching Practices
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Web

Description

The High-Leverage Teaching Practices podcast released by the NFLRC is a series of 7 episodes based on the book Enacting the World of Language Instruction: High-Leverage Teaching Practices by Eileen Glisan and Rick Donato (2017). The episodes are designed to enhance the book contents. All interviews are hosted by Nicole Naditz for the NFLRC. The NFLRC contributed its expertise in instructional design and technology and provided logistical support. Each episode features interviews with world language professionals who share their insights and experience in relation to each of the HLTPs. The lessons linked to each episode contain a video of the interview, additional information with links, a quiz, and question prompts for discussion or reflection.

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Project-Based Language Learning: Inspiring Teachers, Transforming Learning (2016 Online Symposium)
Audio-Visual
Web

Description

On January 12-15, 2016, the Project-Based Language Learning (PBLL) Symposium brought together experts, educational leaders, and world language teachers to foster the conversation on the potential for PBLL to transform and enhance language education. PBLL's intersections with content-based instruction, task-based language learning, and performance assessment make it an ideal conduit to ground language learning on real needs and measurable outcomes. We invited language educators, policymakers, researchers, and innovators to join the conversation and help further refine the PBLL framework by anchoring it to issues and ideas that are relevant to language education. This unique FREE online event provided attendees not only invaluable opportunities to access expertise in PBLL and engage in thought-provoking and constructive dialogues, but also a chance to network with professionals who are passionate about this topic. Eight engaging presentations were distributed across four days (i.e., two sessions per day) and recorded. The videos and presentation slides are available below as open educational resources (OERs).

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Upcoming Events
Jun
2019
25 - 27
Maryland
Workshop
PEARLL Summer Institute: Effective Unit Planning

A thematic curriculum allows teachers to create meaningful, real-world contexts for standards-based teaching and learning. By building on learners’ interests and life experiences, their attitudes, skills and knowledge are developed in meaningful ways. What real-world contexts will guide what students will have to know and be able to do by the end of a unit? Participants will explore how the NCSSFL-ACTFL Can-Do Statements provide a focus on performance and language functions which are used to guide the development of thematic units while allowing teachers and learners to monitor and document student growth. Participants will have time to develop a thematic unit and will receive feedback at each stage of the development process. Access to model curricula in multiple languages will be provided.

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Jul
2019
11 - 13
Maryland
Workshop
PEARLL Summer Institute: Facilitating Teacher Effectiveness

Districts and departments who are focused on developing and implementing a performance-based world language curriculum with district-wide assessments will consider how the Teacher Effectiveness for Language Learning (TELL) Framework provides guidance for more effective instruction resulting in accelerated learning for students. This in-depth professional learning opportunity for district and teacher leaders will engage with and create tools that will support the implementation of effective instruction and assessment. Participants will engage in collaborative work centered around a common definition for high-quality world language learning in order to support the professional growth and development of world language teachers. This workshop will be facilitated by Greta Lundgaard, Thomas Sauer and Laura Terrill. (Developed in collaboration with the National Association of District Supervisor of Foreign Languages)

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Jul
2019
22 - 27
North Carolina
Institute
Summer Workshop in Language Pedagogy, Technologies, Research and Proficiency Testing

The Duke Slavic and Eurasian Language Resource Center will host a summer workshop from July 22 to July 24, 2019 on Language Pedagogy, Research & Proficiency Testing, and is pleased to call for papers by interested scholars, graduate students, and professionals on workshop-related topics and that focus on teaching/learning ANY language. There is an additional session devoted exclusively to Russian language proficiency testing training and certification in CEFR proficiency testing from July 25-27, 2019. Workshop topics have included, but are not limited to: • Neuroimaging and multilingualism • Teaching language and culture through film • Language proficiency testing • Specialized language instruction at the advanced and superior levels • The use of technology in the language classroom • Integrating heritage students in the language classroom • Addressing the needs of differently-abled students • Using computer technologies to create pedagogical materials • The role of grammar in proficiency-based instruction • Popular culture and language instruction • Web resources for language teachers Papers on other related topics are most welcome. Presentations should be approximately 30 minutes in length and in English. The workshop will be held on the campus of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. Modest financial support to defray presenters’ travel expenses may be available. All presenters will be invited to submit their papers for publication in SEELRC’s online peer-reviewed journal Glossos. For further information, please email Michael Newcity at mnewcity@duke.edu Individuals interested in presenting a paper at the workshop should submit an abstract of approximately 200 words to Michael Newcity at mnewcity@duke.edu no later than March 15, 2019. Individuals will be notified whether their papers have been accepted for presentation at the workshop by April 1, 2019.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
  • Research
  • Teaching materials
  • Digital tools and resources
  • Assessment
  • Professional development
  • Less commonly taught languages initiatives
  • K-12 initiatives
  • Outreach and dissemination

Contact Us

You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

Funding

The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
© Title VI Language Resource Centers