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Reanalysis of discernment from a social constructivist perspective: Academic consultation sessions in Japanese universities
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From the social constructivist perspective, this paper examines speech style shifts in academic consultation sessions between professors and students in Japanese universities and demonstrates that politeness is an interactional achievement. The paper attempts to show how what has previously been described as a display of discernment can be reanalyzed as an active co-construction in the sequential organization of talk.

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UG access in L2 acquisition: Reassessing the question Colloquium papers from the Second Language Research Forum 1998 October 15–18, 1998 at the University of Hawai‘i
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Original Invitation to the Colloquium: At a special colloquium at SLRF/Los Angeles in 1989, participants examined the so-called access question: Is Universal Grammar accessible to the (adult) L2 learner? Given that nearly ten years have passed since that colloquium, and given that we have, in that time, learned a good deal more about the nature of the human language faculty, it seems like a good time to reexamine the assumptions that went into the original UG-access research of the 1980s. In particular, then, questions that participants at the present colloquium might consider include (at least) the following: Is the original access question a reasonable one to ask at the present time? Does the current state of linguistic theory, our current understanding of the human language potential, warrant the original question? If not, how should the question be reformulated? How would such a reformulation affect our understanding of previous research, as well as any future attempts at falsification of a reformulated question? After the colloquium, several members of the audience asked whether we had taped or videotaped the session. In fact, the idea had never dawned on any of us. In the days after the conference, we then discussed the feasibility of making the papers available as unpublished manuscripts on the web. Of course, because the manuscripts do not include the Q&A discussions that followed each and every presentation, making the papers web-accessible will not substitute entirely. Nevertheless, we hope that the papers will at least stimulate further discussion of the issues. Indeed, if you have questions of your own, you are certainly welcome to e-mail any of us.

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Virtual connections: Online activities & projects for networking language learners
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Computer networking has created dramatic new possibilities for connecting language learners in a single classroom or across the globe. This collection of activities and projects makes use of email, the World Wide Web, computer conferencing, and other forms of computer-mediated communication for the foreign and second language classroom at any level of instruction. Teachers from around the world submitted the activities compiled in this volume - activities that they have used successfully in their own classrooms.

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Upcoming Events
Sep
2019
25
Texas
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OER Hangout: Creating OER with students

September 25, 2019 at 3pm CDT (1pm PDF / 2pm MDT / 4pm EDT) In this discussion-based webinar, you will hear about two teams who have created open educational resources (OER) with their students. There will be 20 minutes of presentation time, and the rest of the hour will be dedicated to your questions and to conversation between participants and presenters. Register at the link provided below and we will send you the Zoom link to access this OER Hangout before the event. Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credits available for teachers who attend the whole webinar.

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2019
27
Arizona
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LiLaC- Literatures, Languages and Cultures in the 21st Century

CERCLL will be leading a new initiative on campus in this series of events and professional learning communities for the University of Arizona’s faculty, administrators and graduate students in language, literature and culture departments to explore today’s best practices and models for foreign language, literature and culture departments. We are hosting the launch event on Friday, September 27, 2019 (2:00-5:00 pm) on campus. It will feature world-renowned speakers who have a record of innovative program development. In a roundtable discussion, the invited speakers will each share transdisciplinary initiatives they have lead on their home campuses. This will be followed by breakout sessions in which participants can focus on themes of specific significance to them. Through these conversations, we will identify future directions to explore as a campus. The event will conclude with a reception. Featured speakers: Charlotte Melin (Professor of German University of Minnesota-Twin Cities) Gillian Lord (Professor and Chair of the Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies, University of Florida) Domna Stanton (Distinguished Professor of French, CUNY; former President of the MLA) The event is for University of Arizona faculty and graduate students, with a focus in world language study. All participants must register in advance to attend. Organized with the College of Humanities.

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2019
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World Languages Day

Interested in joining us and other Atlanta business, government, and education industry leaders? Register on our website today as a sponsor, exhibitor, or school! World Languages Day is a free information fair connecting over 1,000 high school and college students to businesses and professions that value global skills. World Languages Day is organized as a resource fair in which the students will be able to go from table to table to talk with representatives from different companies, non-profits, and government organizations about the career opportunities in their fields that come with language study and cultural competency. Highlighting these skillsets, World Languages Day’s attending organizations include representatives across international commerce, social services, and governmental agencies. Through real-world experiences, open dialogue about industry needs, and a push for globally-minded talent across potential employees, World Languages Day students are empowered to create a “map” from language success to a future professional career.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

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