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Instructional Guide for Use in Small Classes: Hindi
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This free downloadable Instructional Guide is written for native speakers of Hindi who are teaching Hindi in either a classroom or a tutorial setting. Like the African Language Instructional Guide and the Thai Guide, the Hindi Guide begins with an overview of strategies for creating a language course (e.g., establishing goals, using the L2, and finding and using materials). Following the general information, The Hindi Guide offers three different groupings of lesson plans: basic language-learning lesson plans for beginners, task-based lessons for intermediate learners, and cultural-based modules for advanced learners.

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Instructional Guide for Use in Small Classes: Thai
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This free downloadable Instructional Guide is written for native speakers of Thai who are teaching Thai in either a classroom or a tutorial setting. Like the African Language Instructional Guide, the Thai Guide begins with an overview of strategies for creating a language course (i.e., establishing goals, using the L2, and finding and using materials). Following the general information, The Guide offers three different groupings of lesson plans: basic language-learning lesson plans for beginners, task-based lessons for intermediate learners, and cultural-based modules for advanced learners. Finally, The Guide concludes with some ideas for integrating structure into a communicative-based classroom with sections on teaching vocabulary, integrating grammar, and understanding the sound system.

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Instructional Guide for Use in Small Classes: African Languages
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The free downloadable Instructional Guide for African Languages is written for teachers of any African language. It acts as support material for tutors who are native speakers of African languages who may or may not have a language teaching background. The Guide can also be helpful to experienced language teachers. The Guide begins with an overview of strategies for creating a language course (i.e., establishing goals, using the L2, and finding and using materials). Following the general information, The Guide offers three different groupings of lesson plans: basic language-learning lesson plans for beginners, task-based lessons for intermediate learners, and cultural-based modules for advanced learners. Finally, The Guide concludes with some ideas for integrating structure into a communicative-based classroom with sections on teaching vocabulary, integrating grammar, and understanding the sound system. The accompanying video is intended for use as a training tool for new language teachers who may not be familiar with the language teaching activities found in The Guide. The video depicts three types of language learning activities: information gap activities, role-plays, and text-based lessons. It also discusses topics such maximizing the use of the target language and implementing appropriate error correction.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
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  • Professional development
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  • Outreach and dissemination

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You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

Funding

The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
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