Title Format Sponsor
Pathways V. 09 Eat Shandong From Personal Experience to a Pedagogy of a Second Culture
Print

Description

This book examines the "celebratory," ritualistic and pragmatic functions that Shandong yanxi, or banquets, serve in games of gaining social status in the contemporary Shandong social milieu. Yanxi are a highly ritualized form of performance in which enormous amounts of social capital, and energy are invested. Shandong yanxi are conducted to celebrate such important social occasions as weddings and engagements; festivals; birthdays; sending a friend or relative off on a journey, and welcoming a traveler home from a journey. Although highly festive in nature, these performances play a more serious and pragmatic role in Shandong society as a field of play for the game of gaining social status. In 2013, a second print was produced to meet the need of the readers.

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Songs of Thorns and Flowers series V.3: Winter, 5 Minutes Past Midnight
Print

Description

“Winter, 5 Minutes Past Midnight,” Volume 3 of the “Songs of Thorns and Flowers: Bilingual Performance and Discourse of Modern Korean Poetry” series, was released in November 2012 by NEALRC. This series is anchored by the legacy of the late poet Ku Sang, as an attempt to creatively introduce modern Korean poetry in the pedagogical field of Korean language and literature. Each year, the series features translation of select poems by the winner of the annual Ku Sang Literary Award. This volume contains twenty-one of the poems by Hwang Tong-gyu, winner of the 2011 Ku Sang Literary Award, deemed to best exemplify his vision of nature, human, life, and art.

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Chinese Language Association of Secondary-elementary Schools (CLASS)
Web

Description

The CLASS website is an educational site dedicated to providing information on Chinese language and culture. CLASS offers a platform for K-12 teachers to communicate with each other, exchange ideas, and network with members for the purpose of encouraging more students to learn Chinese.

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Upcoming Events
Mar
2019
20
Arizona
Presentation
University of Arizona Language Fair

This March, the Center for Educational Resources in Culture, Language and Literacy will launch the UA Language Fair, an event designed to raise the visibility of the wide range of languages that students study at The University of Arizona. The event is open to all students, faculty/staff, and visitors to campus. Departments, programs, and UA student clubs representing the languages and cultures taught at UA can register for table space (3-6 feet of space per registration) at which they will showcase the languages taught in their departments and spoken in their communities. CERCLL is also sponsoring small grants (up to $150) to support the purchase of materials for activities or small treats for distribution at these tables. Registration for this event–and the application for funding–will be open on February 15. The deadline to register and apply for funding is March 8, 2019. During the registration process, respondents will be asked to provide the following information: name, department and contact information for the person submitting the application; department / program / organization represented; amount of table space requested (tables are 6 feet in length; registrants can request a half or a whole table, or in the case of a department representing more than one language, they can request multiple tables); business manager name and contact information; a description of the table(s) that will be displayed (maximum 300 words), including language(s) and world regions to be represented, and activities planned; and an itemized budget for any application for funding. Questions? Contact CERCLL at cercll@email.arizona.edu, or (520) 626-8071.

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Apr
2019
6
Arizona
Workshop
LaTeS Workshop: Strengthening your Core: Practices to Support Students’ Language Development

Language Teacher Symposium (LaTeS) Spring 2019 Strengthening your Core: Practices to Support Students’ Language Development Presented by Kristin Davin (University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Department of Middle, Secondary and K12 Education) The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) designated six core practices that are critical for effective language teaching because they support students’ language development and occur frequently in instruction across contexts. These practices include: Facilitating target language comprehensibility, Guiding learners through interpreting authentic resources, Designing oral interpersonal communication tasks, Planning with backward design model, Teaching grammar as a concept and use in context, and Providing appropriate oral feedback. In this workshop, participants will explore these six core practices and the research base of each one. They will dive deeply into two of these practices, Guiding learners through interpreting authentic resources and Designing oral interpersonal communication tasks. Participants will engage in activities that foster their understanding of how to choose appropriate authentic texts and ways to check students’ understanding of those texts. They will also develop and share oral interpersonal communication tasks that foster spontaneous communication and negotiation of meaning. Participants will leave this workshop with a variety of interpretive and interpersonal communication tasks that they can immediately carry out in their classrooms. A certificate for 6 hours of Arizona Continuing Education will be provided to attendees. Saturday April 6, 2019, 9.a.m. to 4 p.m. Location: University of Arizona campus The event is free to attend (including lunch), but registration is required.

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Jun
2019
10 - 11
Texas
Workshop
Spanish Heritage Language Workshop

This is a workshop for Spanish teachers of heritage speaking high school and university level students. We will post more information about this workshop as we continue to organize it. Sign up for COERLL's newsletter to receive updates: https://goo.gl/5zPVze.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

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Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
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  • Outreach and dissemination

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You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

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The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
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