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Korean Wave
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Description

Audiences around the world are now enjoying media products of The Korean Wave, including the wide variety of K-Drama, movies, and K-Pop. K-Dramas are broadcast not only in South Korea, but also in Japan, China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Iran, Kuwait, UAE, all throughout North and South America, and parts of Africa, including Zimbabwe and Ghana. K-Pop music has fan followers from small, rural villages to ultra modern metropolises, literally spanning the globe. The six units in this newest series focus on The Korean Wave. Units 1, 2, and 3 provide a general history and overview of The Korean Wave as well as rich samples of K-Drama excerpts, like scripts and links to video clips, and activities to explore the discourse and compare and contrast cultural practices and products. Units 4, 5, and 6 document the history of K-Pop and provide an overview of this music genre, with a specific focus on two modern idol groups, BUZZ and EXO. Here you’ll find a robust sampling of news releases, fandom blogs, and song lyrics, also with links to selected music videos. The materials contain a variety of activities for students to explore and experience K-Pop song lyrics, fans’ reactions to their favorite groups, and bits of information on behind-the-scenes production and management operations. Like all of the units in our Discourse and Genre series, The Korean Wave units match the goals of the Korean National Standards and are designed for teachers and students to work toward increasing proficiency in the 5Cs, while working with a complex set of discourse-based materials and activities.

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Understanding Teachers of Heritage and Domestic Language Learners
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Description

Understanding Teachers of Heritage and Domestic Language Learners combines case-based learning with multimedia technology. It is organized around five conceptual strands: <br> Teachers as Learners of Languages <br> Beliefs about Language Learning <br> Challenges of Teaching LCTLs <br> Perception of Heritage and Domestic Students <br> Explorations <br><br> The resource provides a window into actual language classrooms, showcasing the complexities of addressing the needs of both heritage and domestic learners in the same language classroom.

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Teaching Heritage and Domestic Language Learners
Audio-Visual

Description

This resource combines case-based learning with multimedia technology. It is organized around five conceptual strands: <br> *Teacher's Voice<br> *Students' Voices<br> *Instructional Challenges<br> *Instructional Strategies<br> *Explorations <br><br> The resource provides a window into actual language classrooms, showcasing the complexities of addressing the needs of both heritage and domestic learners in the same language course. <br> The development of this resource was motivated by addressing two significant needs unique to teachers who teach both heritage and domestic language learners in college/university less-commonly-taught language (LCTL) classrooms: (a) to understand the pedagogical challenges for a teacher in such learning environments; and (b) to use this understanding to create effectual learning communities in those classrooms.

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Upcoming Events
Mar
2019
20
Arizona
Presentation
University of Arizona Language Fair

This March, the Center for Educational Resources in Culture, Language and Literacy will launch the UA Language Fair, an event designed to raise the visibility of the wide range of languages that students study at The University of Arizona. The event is open to all students, faculty/staff, and visitors to campus. Departments, programs, and UA student clubs representing the languages and cultures taught at UA can register for table space (3-6 feet of space per registration) at which they will showcase the languages taught in their departments and spoken in their communities. CERCLL is also sponsoring small grants (up to $150) to support the purchase of materials for activities or small treats for distribution at these tables. Registration for this event–and the application for funding–will be open on February 15. The deadline to register and apply for funding is March 8, 2019. During the registration process, respondents will be asked to provide the following information: name, department and contact information for the person submitting the application; department / program / organization represented; amount of table space requested (tables are 6 feet in length; registrants can request a half or a whole table, or in the case of a department representing more than one language, they can request multiple tables); business manager name and contact information; a description of the table(s) that will be displayed (maximum 300 words), including language(s) and world regions to be represented, and activities planned; and an itemized budget for any application for funding. Questions? Contact CERCLL at cercll@email.arizona.edu, or (520) 626-8071.

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Apr
2019
6
Arizona
Workshop
LaTeS Workshop: Strengthening your Core: Practices to Support Students’ Language Development

Language Teacher Symposium (LaTeS) Spring 2019 Strengthening your Core: Practices to Support Students’ Language Development Presented by Kristin Davin (University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Department of Middle, Secondary and K12 Education) The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) designated six core practices that are critical for effective language teaching because they support students’ language development and occur frequently in instruction across contexts. These practices include: Facilitating target language comprehensibility, Guiding learners through interpreting authentic resources, Designing oral interpersonal communication tasks, Planning with backward design model, Teaching grammar as a concept and use in context, and Providing appropriate oral feedback. In this workshop, participants will explore these six core practices and the research base of each one. They will dive deeply into two of these practices, Guiding learners through interpreting authentic resources and Designing oral interpersonal communication tasks. Participants will engage in activities that foster their understanding of how to choose appropriate authentic texts and ways to check students’ understanding of those texts. They will also develop and share oral interpersonal communication tasks that foster spontaneous communication and negotiation of meaning. Participants will leave this workshop with a variety of interpretive and interpersonal communication tasks that they can immediately carry out in their classrooms. A certificate for 6 hours of Arizona Continuing Education will be provided to attendees. Saturday April 6, 2019, 9.a.m. to 4 p.m. Location: University of Arizona campus The event is free to attend (including lunch), but registration is required.

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Apr
2019
13
Georgia
Workshop
Weapons of Mass Instruction: Making the Most of Planning, Routines, and Structure

Participants will be charged to reflect on the structure, routines, and high-leverage habits that make their class a memorable experience for students rather than just memorized content. In the context of large, diverse classes, the presenter will share the ACTFL Six Core Practice hacks that make can-do and proficiency-based language teaching enjoyable and effective. Participants will receive all files used and then, in turn, create their own versions to fit their own beginning 2019-20 units to start the school year refreshed and excited.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

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Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
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You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

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The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
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