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Korean Wave
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Description

Audiences around the world are now enjoying media products of The Korean Wave, including the wide variety of K-Drama, movies, and K-Pop. K-Dramas are broadcast not only in South Korea, but also in Japan, China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Iran, Kuwait, UAE, all throughout North and South America, and parts of Africa, including Zimbabwe and Ghana. K-Pop music has fan followers from small, rural villages to ultra modern metropolises, literally spanning the globe. The six units in this newest series focus on The Korean Wave. Units 1, 2, and 3 provide a general history and overview of The Korean Wave as well as rich samples of K-Drama excerpts, like scripts and links to video clips, and activities to explore the discourse and compare and contrast cultural practices and products. Units 4, 5, and 6 document the history of K-Pop and provide an overview of this music genre, with a specific focus on two modern idol groups, BUZZ and EXO. Here you’ll find a robust sampling of news releases, fandom blogs, and song lyrics, also with links to selected music videos. The materials contain a variety of activities for students to explore and experience K-Pop song lyrics, fans’ reactions to their favorite groups, and bits of information on behind-the-scenes production and management operations. Like all of the units in our Discourse and Genre series, The Korean Wave units match the goals of the Korean National Standards and are designed for teachers and students to work toward increasing proficiency in the 5Cs, while working with a complex set of discourse-based materials and activities.

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Advanced Language Proficiency Bibliography
Web

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Searchable database of research publications with a focus on "Advanced Language Proficiency".

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Teaching German Modal Particles: A Corpus-based Approach
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Description

This text offers an approach to the challenges of teaching the usage of modal particles to learners of German that emphasizes awareness raising activities. The worksheets and handouts are sequenced to move learners through a gradual process of inductively noticing patterns of modal particle use, to defining modal particle meanings and usages, to analyzing modal particle use in context, and finally, to deductively using modal particles in extended communicative interactions. All worksheets are followed by answer keys which offer additional explanations about appropriate modal particle usage.

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Upcoming Events
Sep
2019
25
Texas
Presentation
OER Hangout: Creating OER with students

September 25, 2019 at 3pm CDT (1pm PDF / 2pm MDT / 4pm EDT) In this discussion-based webinar, you will hear about two teams who have created open educational resources (OER) with their students. There will be 20 minutes of presentation time, and the rest of the hour will be dedicated to your questions and to conversation between participants and presenters. Register at the link provided below and we will send you the Zoom link to access this OER Hangout before the event. Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credits available for teachers who attend the whole webinar.

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Sep
2019
27
Arizona
Symposium
LiLaC- Literatures, Languages and Cultures in the 21st Century

CERCLL will be leading a new initiative on campus in this series of events and professional learning communities for the University of Arizona’s faculty, administrators and graduate students in language, literature and culture departments to explore today’s best practices and models for foreign language, literature and culture departments. We are hosting the launch event on Friday, September 27, 2019 (2:00-5:00 pm) on campus. It will feature world-renowned speakers who have a record of innovative program development. In a roundtable discussion, the invited speakers will each share transdisciplinary initiatives they have lead on their home campuses. This will be followed by breakout sessions in which participants can focus on themes of specific significance to them. Through these conversations, we will identify future directions to explore as a campus. The event will conclude with a reception. Featured speakers: Charlotte Melin (Professor of German University of Minnesota-Twin Cities) Gillian Lord (Professor and Chair of the Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies, University of Florida) Domna Stanton (Distinguished Professor of French, CUNY; former President of the MLA) The event is for University of Arizona faculty and graduate students, with a focus in world language study. All participants must register in advance to attend. Organized with the College of Humanities.

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Oct
2019
4
Georgia
Symposium
World Languages Day

Interested in joining us and other Atlanta business, government, and education industry leaders? Register on our website today as a sponsor, exhibitor, or school! World Languages Day is a free information fair connecting over 1,000 high school and college students to businesses and professions that value global skills. World Languages Day is organized as a resource fair in which the students will be able to go from table to table to talk with representatives from different companies, non-profits, and government organizations about the career opportunities in their fields that come with language study and cultural competency. Highlighting these skillsets, World Languages Day’s attending organizations include representatives across international commerce, social services, and governmental agencies. Through real-world experiences, open dialogue about industry needs, and a push for globally-minded talent across potential employees, World Languages Day students are empowered to create a “map” from language success to a future professional career.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
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You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

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The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
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