Title Format Sponsor
Sepedi Brochure
Print

Description

Like the Sotho and Tswana, the Pedi in pre-conquest times lived in large villages divided into groups centered on family clusters favoring paternal line. Each consisted of a group of households built around a central area which combined meeting place, cattle byre, graveyard and ancestral shrine. Homes were ranked in order of seniority. Each wife had her own round thatched homestead, joined to the others by a series of open-air enclosures (lapa) encircled by mud walls.

Resource Link
Serer-Sine
Print

Description

The Serer are famous throughout Senegal and Gambia for their clothing. Serr is a traditional clothing woven by men. Serr is believed to bring good luck to those who wear it. The Serer people are also famous for a form of wrestling that is popular throughout the region called Laamb or Njomb. Serer religion is centered on universal supreme deity called Rog. There are also lesser gods, goddesses and spirits. The Serers strongly believe in the importance of the ancestral spirits (pangool) and reincarnation.

Resource Link
Tumbuka Brochure
Print

Description

The Tumbuka are an ethnic group living in Malawi, Zambia and Tanzania. In the Tumbuka mythology, Chiuta is the chief deity; he is all-powerful, omniscient and self-created. Chiuta literally means Great Bow and is symbolised in the sky by the rainbow. He is also a god of rain and fertility. Tumbuka, like most African languages, has many myths that constitute its cultural heritage.These myths, told around fires at night, often to the accompaniment of drumming and choral responses, aim to teach children moral behavior and to entertain. these vidokoni (fictitious stories) have a moral behind them.

Resource Link
3 of 687
Show all
Show free resources only
Show less
Show more
Upcoming Events
Jul
2019
22 - 27
North Carolina
Institute
Summer Workshop in Language Pedagogy, Technologies, Research and Proficiency Testing

The Duke Slavic and Eurasian Language Resource Center will host a summer workshop from July 22 to July 24, 2019 on Language Pedagogy, Research & Proficiency Testing, and is pleased to call for papers by interested scholars, graduate students, and professionals on workshop-related topics and that focus on teaching/learning ANY language. There is an additional session devoted exclusively to Russian language proficiency testing training and certification in CEFR proficiency testing from July 25-27, 2019. Workshop topics have included, but are not limited to: • Neuroimaging and multilingualism • Teaching language and culture through film • Language proficiency testing • Specialized language instruction at the advanced and superior levels • The use of technology in the language classroom • Integrating heritage students in the language classroom • Addressing the needs of differently-abled students • Using computer technologies to create pedagogical materials • The role of grammar in proficiency-based instruction • Popular culture and language instruction • Web resources for language teachers Papers on other related topics are most welcome. Presentations should be approximately 30 minutes in length and in English. The workshop will be held on the campus of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. Modest financial support to defray presenters’ travel expenses may be available. All presenters will be invited to submit their papers for publication in SEELRC’s online peer-reviewed journal Glossos. For further information, please email Michael Newcity at mnewcity@duke.edu Individuals interested in presenting a paper at the workshop should submit an abstract of approximately 200 words to Michael Newcity at mnewcity@duke.edu no later than March 15, 2019. Individuals will be notified whether their papers have been accepted for presentation at the workshop by April 1, 2019.

Event Link
Jul
2019
22 - 26
Minnesota
Institute
2019 Summer Institute: Exploring Project-Based Language Learning

Language teachers! Thinking you might have missed the boat on Project-Based Language Learning (PBLL)? It's not too late! Come catch our Summer Institute on the road in Minnesota, July 22-26, 2019! This Institute is designed for educators with little or no background in PBLL. This summer institute is a special collaboration with the NFLRC and the Center for Advanced Research on Language Acquisition at the University of Minnesota. Project-based language learning (PBLL) connects the language classroom to the world beyond through learners’ focus on challenging problems or questions as an organizing principle for learning. In the first part of this institute, participants will examine established principles and standards for high-quality project-based learning (HQPBL) as well as issues and concerns specific to PBLL, such as how to apply the concept of “sustained inquiry” at the Novice level. Participants will engage in guided project idea generation and peer critique, exploring how better to connect with community partners and a public audience. In the second part of the institute, the participants will choose one of their favorite project ideas and flesh it out by aligning to standards, establishing learning outcomes and corresponding assessments, developing one or more assessment rubrics, and designing scaffolding for language, content, interactions, process, product, and use of technology. After this institute, you will be able to: • Develop and outline a compelling and contextualized project-based language learning project; • Foster language proficiency development through appropriate communicative events embedded in project-based language learning experiences; • Employ effective scaffolding strategies that contribute toward final achievement of learning outcomes; • Use the 7-category observational checklist that describes best practice in Imm/DL classroom instruction to improve teaching and learning; • Design and implement effective assessments; and • Use appropriate technology for locating project partners and culturally authentic materials.

Event Link
Aug
2019
1 - 2
Texas
Workshop
Games2Teach Collaboratory

An interactive workshop where teachers play technology-mediated games, learn how game design principles promote language acquisition, and learn to implement games in their classrooms. Based on the Games2Teach project from CASLS (University of Oregon) and CERCLL (University of Arizona). We will post more information about this workshop as we continue to organize it. Sign up for COERLL's newsletter to receive updates: https://goo.gl/5zPVze.

Event Link
0 - 3 of 7
All LRCs
Previous LRC
Next LRC
In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
  • Research
  • Teaching materials
  • Digital tools and resources
  • Assessment
  • Professional development
  • Less commonly taught languages initiatives
  • K-12 initiatives
  • Outreach and dissemination

Contact Us

You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

Funding

The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
© Title VI Language Resource Centers