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Virtual Petersburg
Web

Description

Tour St. Petersburg, virtually! Explore hundreds of photos and virtual reality panoramic movies of St. Petersburg, Peterhof, Helsinki, Stockholm, Tallinn, Narva, and more!

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Interpreting the Forms czyta and czytaj in the Polish Conjugational System
Audio-Visual

Description

A discussion of how to derive the Polish forms czyta and czytaj, using the Jakobsonian one-stem verb system. Since the forms both appear to have the same stem (czytaj-) and ending (zero), linguists have struggled with the derivation of the two separate forms. The proposed solution is to treat imperatives as having both an internal and external word-final boundary, as evidence by devoicing phenomena. This boundary conditions the different forms in question.

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The Enigma of the Polish form król and Jakobson’s Explanation of Slavic *tort forms
Audio-Visual

Description

Discusses the problematic issue of length reflexes in the o vowel of Polish *tort forms. Jakobson had assumed that the vowel o was a generalization of shortness, but this cannot explain the form król. Andersen’s theory of the relative chronology of short a > o is presented, along with a new proposal for a variable treatment of long o either as a single segment or a sequence of two shorts, accounting for the different *tort reflexes in Lekhitic-Sorbian and East Slavic.

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Upcoming Events
Jan
2020
23 - 26
Arizona
Conference
2020 International Conference on the Development and Assessment of Intercultural Competence

Seventh International Conference on the Development and Assessment of Intercultural Competence. Internationalizing the Curriculum: The Role of Intercultural Competence on January 23-26, 2020, in Tucson, Arizona, and online. Invited Presentations: Adriana Diaz (University of Queensland – Australia) Marianne Larsen (Western University – Canada) Sharon Stein (University of British Columbia – Canada) This biennial event brings together researchers and practitioners across languages, levels, and settings to discuss and share research, theory, and best practices, and to foster meaningful professional dialog on issues related to the development and assessment of Intercultural Competence, especially in a foreign or second language. The 2020 ICC conference will take stock of current models for internationalizing curricula as well as the genealogies of these discussions. The organizers are interested in accounts of best practices as well as critical examinations of current trends and conceptual think pieces around what it might mean to internationalize higher education. Proposal submission deadline: May 31, 2019

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Mar
2020
25
Arizona
Conference
University of Arizona Language Fair

In Spring 2020, the Center for Educational Resources in Culture, Language and Literacy (CERCLL) launched the UA Language Fair, an event designed to raise the visibility of the wide range of languages that students study at The University of Arizona. The event was open to all students, faculty/staff, and visitors to campus. Departments, programs, and UA student clubs representing the languages and cultures taught at UA showcased the languages taught in their departments and spoken in their communities. Participants enjoyed free food, games and other activities that celebrate the benefits and opportunities that come from communicating in another language. In 2019, the following languages were represented: American Sign Language Ancient Greek Arabic Chinese English as a Foreign Language French German Hebrew Italian Japanese Kazakh Korean Latin Navajo Persian Portuguese Russian Spanish Tohono O’odham Turkish With representatives from the following programs on hand, to share information about their offerings as well: Critical Languages Program Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) scholarships for language study Global Studies Program UA Study Abroad Current students in language programs joined in the fun, and new ones were recruited for Fall classes!

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

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