Title Format Sponsor
Foreign Languages: Doors to Opportunity (Discussion Guide)
Print

Description

This guide accompanies the video (available separately), which is designed in two parts of approximately twelve minutes each. The first part is intended for use with middle and high school students of foreign languages. The second part is designed for K-12 educators, including teachers, guidance counselors, administrators, and parents. This Discussion Guide accompanies the video (available separately) and contains preview and postview activities to help educators in facilitating discussion of both parts of the video.

Resource Link
Selected papers from Pragmatics in the CJK Classroom: The state of the art
Web

Description

This online collection (http://nflrc.hawaii.edu/CJKProceedings/) presents 10 selected papers from the forum on Pragmatics in the CJK Classroom: The State of the Art held from June 5 to June 7, 2006 at the University of Hawai‘i-Manoa in Honolulu, Hawai‘i. The papers are representative of the many outstanding contributions to the field of L2 pragmatics that were presented at the gathering. The papers are also representative of the diverse range of research interests and pedagogical issues taken up by the conference presenters. Cumulatively, the papers in this volume address current concerns in L2 pragmatics that range from the development of pragmatic competence by children and college-age students in both foreign and second language settings to pragmatics-focused instruction in the foreign language classroom for students at all levels of foreign language learning. The pedagogically-oriented contributions are diverse in their scope: from innovative approaches for teaching true beginners to the specialized curriculum of students receiving post-graduate professional training. Instructional innovations for L2 classroom pragmatics-focused teaching from each of the language groups — Chinese, Japanese, and Korean — are included.

Resource Link
Case studies in foreign language placement: Practices and possibilities
Print

Description

Although most language programs make placement decisions on the basis of placement tests, there is surprisingly little published about different contexts and systems of placement testing. The present volume contains case studies of placement programs in foreign language programs at the tertiary level across the United States. The different programs span the spectrum from large programs servicing hundreds of students annually to small language programs with very few students. The contributions to this volume address such issues as how the size of the program, presence or absence of heritage learners, and population changes affect language placement decisions.

Resource Link
3 of 702
Show all
Show free resources only
Show less
Show more
Upcoming Events
Feb
2020
29
North Carolina
Workshop
6th Annual Olympiada of Spoken Russian, Carolinas District

Participants may earn gold, silver, or bronze medals in recognition of their proficiency in Russian conversation, poetry recitation, and Russian civilization at various levels of study. In addition, every third or fourth year outstanding contestants at regional ACTR Olympiada contests have the opportunity to participate in an international Olympiada contest that takes place in Moscow and brings together winners of Russian Olympiada contests from throughout the world to compete for international medals and engage in a rich program of cultural activities.

Event Link
Mar
2020
4
Texas
Presentation
OER Hangout: Stories from teachers who have adopted and adapted OER

6pm CST (4pm PST / 5pm MST / 7pm EST) Presenter(s): Alexandra Gouirand (South Puget Sound Community College) Dawn Michael (Reynoldsburg City Schools) Valérie Morgan (California State University San Bernardino) Open educational resources (OER) are free to access. Open Creative Commons licenses allow teachers to legally make copies, adapt, and share these resources in order to meet the specific needs of their students. Celebrate Open Education Week by attending this discussion-based webinar, where you will have a chance to chat with two instructors who have adopted OER and creatively adapted the content for their language classes. Dawn Michael has been teaching French since 1991, and is currently a high school French teacher in Ohio. She uses the open curriculum Français interactif to teach blended French 1 and 2 courses and creates her own supplements to accompany the resources. Valérie Morgan is a French lecturer. She uses the open curriculum Français interactif to teach Levels 1, 2, and 3 French. To supplement the textbook she uses Google Classroom, Google Tools, Flipgrid, and Padlet. There will be 20 minutes of presentation time, and the rest of the hour will be dedicated to your questions and to conversation between participants and panelists.

Event Link
Mar
2020
12
Texas
Presentation
OER Hangout: Making your language curriculum more inclusive

3:30pm CDT (1:30pm PDT / 2:30pm MDT / 4:30pm EDT) Presenter(s): Kia London Jenniffer Whyte Language students and instructors, and speakers of any given language, come from all different backgrounds and identify with a variety of races, ethnicities, cultures, abilities, genders, sexual orientations, ages, religions, languages, body types, and socio-economic statuses. However, this wide-ranging human experience isn’t always represented in traditional language-learning materials. In this discussion-based webinar, panelists and participants will share ideas for developing classroom activities that include perspectives from a more diverse group of people, especially from populations not traditionally represented in textbooks. Kia London and Jenniffer Whyte will share examples of how they have incorporated Afro-Latino culture into their K-12 Spanish classrooms, but we hope instructors of all languages and levels will join for this universally applicable discussion! There will be 20 minutes of presentation time, and the rest of the hour will be dedicated to your questions and to conversation between participants and panelists.

Event Link
0 - 3 of 9
All LRCs
Previous LRC
Next LRC
In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
  • Research
  • Teaching materials
  • Digital tools and resources
  • Assessment
  • Professional development
  • Less commonly taught languages initiatives
  • K-12 initiatives
  • Outreach and dissemination

Contact Us

You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

Funding

The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
© Title VI Language Resource Centers