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Performance and portfolio assessment (1985–1995): An extended annotated bibliography of sources useful for language teachers
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This bibliography offers a collection of extended article summaries drawn from the performance and portfolio assessment literature of the past decade. Articles include journal entries as well as book chapters, and they were chosen based on the representation of various segments of the relevant literature. Annotated entries represent the general education literature and the L2 literature, and they cover theoretical bases for performance and portfolio assessment as well as implementation of and research on alternative forms of assessment. Also included are representative articles from the relevant assessment validity literature. Finally, other related references (not annotated in the current bibliography) are listed. The bibliography should be of use to language testers, language educators, and language researchers interested in the development of performance and portfolio assessment over the past ten years.

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Reanalysis of discernment from a social constructivist perspective: Academic consultation sessions in Japanese universities
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From the social constructivist perspective, this paper examines speech style shifts in academic consultation sessions between professors and students in Japanese universities and demonstrates that politeness is an interactional achievement. The paper attempts to show how what has previously been described as a display of discernment can be reanalyzed as an active co-construction in the sequential organization of talk.

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UG access in L2 acquisition: Reassessing the question Colloquium papers from the Second Language Research Forum 1998 October 15–18, 1998 at the University of Hawai‘i
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Original Invitation to the Colloquium: At a special colloquium at SLRF/Los Angeles in 1989, participants examined the so-called access question: Is Universal Grammar accessible to the (adult) L2 learner? Given that nearly ten years have passed since that colloquium, and given that we have, in that time, learned a good deal more about the nature of the human language faculty, it seems like a good time to reexamine the assumptions that went into the original UG-access research of the 1980s. In particular, then, questions that participants at the present colloquium might consider include (at least) the following: Is the original access question a reasonable one to ask at the present time? Does the current state of linguistic theory, our current understanding of the human language potential, warrant the original question? If not, how should the question be reformulated? How would such a reformulation affect our understanding of previous research, as well as any future attempts at falsification of a reformulated question? After the colloquium, several members of the audience asked whether we had taped or videotaped the session. In fact, the idea had never dawned on any of us. In the days after the conference, we then discussed the feasibility of making the papers available as unpublished manuscripts on the web. Of course, because the manuscripts do not include the Q&A discussions that followed each and every presentation, making the papers web-accessible will not substitute entirely. Nevertheless, we hope that the papers will at least stimulate further discussion of the issues. Indeed, if you have questions of your own, you are certainly welcome to e-mail any of us.

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Upcoming Events
Jun
2019
3
Texas
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OER Hangout - Impact of OER on teaching practices

Join us to hear how engagement with OER and/or OEP influenced the teaching practices of four language instructors. There will be a 25 minute presentation segement, and the rest of the time will be for questions and discussion. Information about presenters and their work: Sonia Balasch worked with a team of colleagues to create Español y cultura en perspectiva: A collection of nine critical-thinking thematic lessons composed of Spanish language readings and communicative activities for intermediate-level students of Spanish. Margherita Berti created Italian Open Education, a website that offers a collection of openly-licensed and free-to-use 360-degree virtual reality videos for Italian learners and teachers. Julianne Hammink is working with the Center for ESL at the University of Arizona to develop instructional materials for ESL and Academic Pathways programs. These materials are developed from Open Educational Resources. They are finishing the first year of the project, and many of our instructional materials are now in use. David Thompson completed a series of problem-based learning units for advanced students of Spanish available to instructors online as OER to use or modify. The purpose of the units is to provide advanced students of Spanish a series of compelling problems from Spanish culture and society to solve collaboratively in small teams.

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Jun
2019
5 - 12
Hawaii
Presentation
2019 NFLRC Webinars: Harnessing High-Leverage Teaching Practices (HLTPs) in Project-Based Language Learning (PBLL)

In our two-part NFLRC Webinars titled Harnessing HLTPs in PBLL, we will explore the question “What HLTP concepts would help me design, develop, and implement PBLL experiences more effectively?” In order to get maximum benefit from the two webinars, we recommend that you 1) familiarize yourself with the six High-Leverage Teaching Practices (HLTPs) beforehand and 2) have experience with Project-Based Language Learning (PBLL). This, however, is not a requirement, and any participant with interest in both is welcome to attend. NOTE: These webinars will be recorded and made available at a later date. Webinar 1: Wednesday, June 5 (PBLL & HLTPs #1-3) Host: Nicole Naditz Guests: Adam Ross & Rachel Mamiya Hernandez Webinar 2: Wednesday, June 12 (PBLL & HLTPs #4-6) Host: Nicole Naditz Guests: Megan Ferry & Laura Sexton Session times (two 90-minute live webinars) 2pm Hawai‘i | 5pm PST | 6pm MST | 7pm CST | 8pm EST Cost Free To register, visit our webpage: https://nflrc.hawaii.edu/events/view/121/. Registration deadline June 4, 2019.

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Jun
2019
10 - 11
Texas
Workshop
Spanish Heritage Language Workshop

This is a workshop for Spanish teachers of heritage speaking high school and university level students. We will post more information about this workshop as we continue to organize it. Sign up for COERLL's newsletter to receive updates: https://goo.gl/5zPVze.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

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