Title Format Sponsor
Heritage Spanish
Web

Description

This is an online community for finding and sharing resources for teaching Spanish to heritage speakers. View and contribute syllabi, activities, lessons, information about events, etc. to this growing community.

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Foreign Languages and the Literary in the Everyday (FLLITE)
Web

Description

The FLLITE Project takes the creative moments found in everyday language use as the basis for lessons in second language literacy. By emphasizing language play as central to communication, FLLITE lessons aim to develop language awareness as well as communicative abilities through the integration of speaking, reading, listening, and writing tasks. The goal of the FLLITE Project is the publication of lessons based on authentic texts in both commonly and less-commonly taught languages, for example, blogs, Internet memes, YouTube videos, slam poetry, and so forth. When you submit a lesson, the FLLITE editorial board will give you feedback to improve your lesson for publication. In addition, you will learn how to adopt an open copyright license (Creative Commons) that gives the public the right to access, adapt, and re-use your lesson. FLLITE is sponsored by CERCLL (University of Arizona) and COERLL (University of Texas at Austin).

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Pragmatics & Language Learning, Vol. 14, 2016
Print

Description

This volume contains a selection of papers presented at the 2014 International Conference of Pragmatics and Language Learning at Indiana University. It includes fourteen papers on a variety of topics, with a diversity of first and second languages, and a wide range of methods used to collect pragmatic data in L2 and FL settings. This volume is divided into three main sections: Acquisition of Second-Language Pragmatics, Research in Pedagogical Contexts, and Brief Summaries and Reports. The articles advance our understanding of second language pragmatics with regard to learning and the use of pragmalinguistic resources necessary to produce and comprehend speech acts, conventional expressions, discourse markers, relational talk to develop L2 symbolic competence, and polite expressions in language textbooks.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

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The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
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