Title Format Sponsor
Intercultural Pragmatic Interactional Competence (IPIC) Assessment
Web

Description

A national emphasis on high-stakes testing has fueled the development and expansion of proficiency assessments. IPIC adds to this repertoire through the creation of a validated assessment to evaluate students’ intercultural, pragmatic, and interactional competence in multilingual interactions. Utilizing digital simulations, the assessment guides students though three scenarios with varying power and social distance factors to generate a learner profile based on four dimensions critical to competence in this area: knowledge, analytical abilities, subjectivity, and awareness. The three scenarios entail a peer-to-peer interaction, a service encounter between strangers, and a teacher-student or boss-employee interaction. The simulation allows for an individualized experience validated across learners, examines a set of macro-level skills used to interface with other linguistic abilities, and provides a context adept at considering language variation. Using this assessment, IPIC will aid educators in evaluating students’ ability to navigate multilingual interactions. IPIC is a partnership with the Assessment and Evaluation Language Resource Center (AELRC) at Georgetown University.

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Bridging Project
Web

Description

Encouraging students with high levels of proficiency, especially those who graduate from immersion programs and heritage students, to continue language study has become increasingly more challenging. Attrition rates of these advanced-level students across the country continue to rise. The Bridging Project creates meaningful learning experiences to help motivate high school students with high levels of proficiency to continue studying language. Students work in teams to create a place-based, mobile experience for members of their local community using the target language. Each project is themed around engagement in a relevant content area such as sustainability, water rights, and global business. Each team has the option of submitting their project to a scholarship competition.

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Ecopod
Mobile & Tablets

Description

Helping students make the connection between their language study and their daily lives can increase both their motivation and their proficiency. Ecopod expands the language classroom and brings languages to students living in the University of Oregon Global Scholars Hall. Students enroll in a yearlong course to explore being multilingual in a local, national, and international context. Through the course, students play a place-based, augmented reality game in which they are responsible for the health of their residence hall, also known as a pod. They engage in modules requiring them to use both language and content expertise to solve problems, find collaborators, and build community. For example, students work together to select proper resources to survive a pandemic, collaborate to save a region’s population from genocide, and ensure maximum sustainability in their community. Students also develop their own module in the target language to build proficiency through the creation of text, narrative, and tasks for others.

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Upcoming Events
Jun
2018
24 - 26
Arizona
Institute
Reading Globally: Critical Issues in Global Literature for Children and Adolescents

Presented by Kathy Short (University of Arizona) with experts and authors in global literature. We live in a world where our lives are interconnected in complex ways across global cultures as well as fractured with tensions that divide us. Global children’s literature provides one means of facilitating intercultural understanding, but issues of availability, access, authenticity, and classroom use must be addressed for this potential to be realized. In this institute, participants will explore current trends in global literature for children and adolescents, examine critical issues and approaches to analyzing these books, and experience strategies for critically engaging with global literature. Participants will use the Worlds of Words collection (http://wowlit.org) to be immersed in a wealth of global literature as well as to delve deeply into key books to develop critical understandings and to consider how to invite students into a critical reading of the word. An additional component will be interactions that pair classic, well-known texts often used in elementary and secondary classrooms with global children’s and adolescent literature to expand the curriculum and include global perspectives.

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Jun
2018
25 - 26
Pennsylvania
Workshop
Designing Articulated Performance Assessment in the Three Modes of Communication

This workshop will guide participants in designing performance assessment tasks in the three modes of communication, articulated across three levels. We will explore Interpretive, Interpersonal, and Presentational mode tasks and design integrated assessment around a theme and context. We will also develop specific Can-Do Statements from them, a key implementation piece, keeping transfer and intercultural competence in mind. Examples of integrated tasks with novice high, intermediate mid, and advanced low performance targets will be presented and explored.

Event Link
Jun
2018
25
Michigan
Workshop
Increasing proficiency through World Language Core Practices

Looking to up your proficiency game? World Language Core Practices, recently published by ACTFL, are research-supported “teacher moves” that support language learners in gaining proficiency. The practices include using the target language, providing interpersonal communication tasks, employing functional goals and objectives, teaching grammar use in context, using authentic texts, and providing appropriate feedback. Participants in this two-day make-and-take workshop (an expanded version of last year's one-day) can expect to explore the reasoning behind World Language Core Practices, the how-to of using them, and spend time creating their own activities and/or plans for nurturing more proficient world language students.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
  • Research
  • Teaching materials
  • Digital tools and resources
  • Assessment
  • Professional development
  • Less commonly taught languages initiatives
  • K-12 initiatives
  • Outreach and dissemination

Contact Us

You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

Funding

The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
© Title VI Language Resource Centers