Title Format Sponsor
Chinese Communicating in the Culture DVD
Audio-Visual

Description

This DVD accompanies the texts, "Chinese Communicating in the Culture 1" and "Chinese Communicating in the Culture 2"

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Intermediate Chinese
Print

Description

This text is the second in a series of three closely integrated volumes of spoken Chinese for use at the high-school and college levels. Intermediate Chinese presents dialogues on everyday topics together with analysis of anticipated points of difficulty for the student and numerous sentences illustrating the usage of all new words and grammar.

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Kaleidoscope Vol. 1 Spoken Cantonese: Context and Performance with 19 audio cassettes and 1 video
Print

Description

The Kaleidoscope Volume 1 is the introductory textbook for American students to learn Cantonese. The Yale romanization system is used for the illustration of the characters in this volume. The book introduces speaking in natural speed and tone. More importantly, learning will be based on context and performance.

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Upcoming Events
Jul
2019
22 - 27
North Carolina
Institute
Summer Workshop in Language Pedagogy, Technologies, Research and Proficiency Testing

The Duke Slavic and Eurasian Language Resource Center will host a summer workshop from July 22 to July 24, 2019 on Language Pedagogy, Research & Proficiency Testing, and is pleased to call for papers by interested scholars, graduate students, and professionals on workshop-related topics and that focus on teaching/learning ANY language. There is an additional session devoted exclusively to Russian language proficiency testing training and certification in CEFR proficiency testing from July 25-27, 2019. Workshop topics have included, but are not limited to: • Neuroimaging and multilingualism • Teaching language and culture through film • Language proficiency testing • Specialized language instruction at the advanced and superior levels • The use of technology in the language classroom • Integrating heritage students in the language classroom • Addressing the needs of differently-abled students • Using computer technologies to create pedagogical materials • The role of grammar in proficiency-based instruction • Popular culture and language instruction • Web resources for language teachers Papers on other related topics are most welcome. Presentations should be approximately 30 minutes in length and in English. The workshop will be held on the campus of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. Modest financial support to defray presenters’ travel expenses may be available. All presenters will be invited to submit their papers for publication in SEELRC’s online peer-reviewed journal Glossos. For further information, please email Michael Newcity at mnewcity@duke.edu Individuals interested in presenting a paper at the workshop should submit an abstract of approximately 200 words to Michael Newcity at mnewcity@duke.edu no later than March 15, 2019. Individuals will be notified whether their papers have been accepted for presentation at the workshop by April 1, 2019.

Event Link
Jul
2019
22 - 26
Minnesota
Institute
2019 Summer Institute: Exploring Project-Based Language Learning

Language teachers! Thinking you might have missed the boat on Project-Based Language Learning (PBLL)? It's not too late! Come catch our Summer Institute on the road in Minnesota, July 22-26, 2019! This Institute is designed for educators with little or no background in PBLL. This summer institute is a special collaboration with the NFLRC and the Center for Advanced Research on Language Acquisition at the University of Minnesota. Project-based language learning (PBLL) connects the language classroom to the world beyond through learners’ focus on challenging problems or questions as an organizing principle for learning. In the first part of this institute, participants will examine established principles and standards for high-quality project-based learning (HQPBL) as well as issues and concerns specific to PBLL, such as how to apply the concept of “sustained inquiry” at the Novice level. Participants will engage in guided project idea generation and peer critique, exploring how better to connect with community partners and a public audience. In the second part of the institute, the participants will choose one of their favorite project ideas and flesh it out by aligning to standards, establishing learning outcomes and corresponding assessments, developing one or more assessment rubrics, and designing scaffolding for language, content, interactions, process, product, and use of technology. After this institute, you will be able to: • Develop and outline a compelling and contextualized project-based language learning project; • Foster language proficiency development through appropriate communicative events embedded in project-based language learning experiences; • Employ effective scaffolding strategies that contribute toward final achievement of learning outcomes; • Use the 7-category observational checklist that describes best practice in Imm/DL classroom instruction to improve teaching and learning; • Design and implement effective assessments; and • Use appropriate technology for locating project partners and culturally authentic materials.

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Aug
2019
1 - 2
Texas
Workshop
Games2Teach Collaboratory

An interactive workshop where teachers play technology-mediated games, learn how game design principles promote language acquisition, and learn to implement games in their classrooms. Based on the Games2Teach project from CASLS (University of Oregon) and CERCLL (University of Arizona). We will post more information about this workshop as we continue to organize it. Sign up for COERLL's newsletter to receive updates: https://goo.gl/5zPVze.

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In 1990, the Department of Education established the first Language Resource Centers (LRCs) at U.S. universities in response to the growing national need for expertise and competence in foreign languages. Now, twenty-five years later, Title VI of the Higher Education Act supports sixteen LRCs, creating a national network of resources to promote and improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LRCs create language learning and teaching materials, offer professional development opportunities for language instructors, and conduct and disseminate research on foreign language learning. All LRCs engage in efforts that enable U.S. citizens to better work, serve, and lead.

8 Areas of Focus

Each LRC has a unique story and mission, but all LRC work is organized around eight basic areas:
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You may also contact each LRC individually by locating their directory information in the Meet the LRCs menu.

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The U.S. Department of Education Title VI provides funding for Language Resource Centers. The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education nor imply endorsement by the federal government.
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